Posts Tagged: Robin Coste Lewis

What to Read When You Want to Celebrate Black History

By

Rumpus editors share for their favorite writing that speaks to black history, past and present.

...more

Notable Los Angeles: 2/5–2/11

By

Literary events and readings in and around L.A. this week!

...more

Notable Twin Cities: 3/12–3/18

By

Monday 3/13: At Magers & Quinn, novelist Nickolas Butler reads from his newest work, The Hearts of Men. 7 p.m., free. Over at Subtext books, you can find another perspective on masculinity. Robert Jensen will present The End of Patriarchy: Radical Feminism for Men. Jensen will read from the book and then sign copies. 7 […]

...more

Notable Portland: 3/2–3/8

By

Thursday 3/2: Join Alex Chiu, Sophie Franz, Josh Simmons, Lark Pien, Jacon Sturgill, Erin Nations, and others for the launch of the seventh issue of Vision Quest, Portland’s free comic newspaper. Floating World Comics, 6 p.m., free. Robin Coste Lewis reads from her latest book, Voyage of the Sable Venus. Reed College, 6:30 p.m., free.

...more

Beware of Dog

By

At the Poetry Foundation, Sara Ivry interviews a host of poets on the occasion of Cave Canem’s twentieth anniversary. Robin Coste Lewis points to the brilliance of founders Toi Derricotte and Cornelius Eady in situating Cave Canem above the fray: We’re here to write and to write about our own experiences, our own cultures, sometimes, sometimes […]

...more

Poetry as Peace Work

By

Over at Los Angeles Review of Books, Leah Mirakhor engages poet Robin Coste Lewis, 2015 National Book Award winner of Voyage of the Sable Venus, in deep and generous conversation about writing and life. Coste Lewis remembers Audre Lorde as a poet who “refused to condescend to her readers,” and who was a great inspiration to […]

...more

Learning to Write, One Sentence at a Time

By

At the Guardian, Angela Chen profiles poet Robin Coste Lewis, who was only permitted to write one sentence a day after sustaining severe brain damage: “I would sit there for eight hours a day thinking of one line and it became delicious,” Lewis says. “It was this huge epiphany—‘Oh, this is what poetry is! You can […]

...more