Posts Tagged: Roxane Gay

Marveling At Roxane Gay

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The literary community loves Rumpus Essays Editor Roxanne Gay. She’s prolific, supportive, and a great writer. Jason Diamond, writing over at Flavorwire, explains further:

While I can’t really comment on whether she’s from Krypton or offer any definitive knowledge of her sleep habits, as somebody who has read Gay’s work for a few years now, the thing I’ve always found interesting about it is that she can straddle the line between being a “writer’s writer” (a term I mostly detest, but one that does adequately sum up the sort of writer whose dedication to the craft earns them just as many devoted followers as readers) and one who is able to get a wider audience to pay attention and react in some way to her words.

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Profiling Roxane Gay

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Tim Obaro profiles Rumpus Essays Editor Roxane Gay and looks at her debut novel, An Untamed State, for Chicago Magazine. The novel follows a middle-class newlywed kidnapped while on vacation in Haiti. Obaro writes:

Born in Omaha, Gay conceived the idea for the novel after hearing her Haitian parents talk of acquaintances with family members who had been kidnapped.

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Roxane Gay Rocking It at Kirkus Review!

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We wrote previously about some of our editors getting amazing write-ups at Kirkus Review. Well, now essays editor Roxane Gay has received a starred Kirkus review for her new novel, An Untamed State. Check it out:

“The closing chapters suggest that Mireille is on the path to recovery, but it’s also clear that a true recovery is impossible; many of Gay’s scenes deliberately undermine traditional novelistic methods of resolution (baking bread, acts of vengeance, acting out sexually).

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The Age of Knowledge

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Lately, the news about Woody Allen has been flooding social media outlets. It’s “as if we are playing a national game of Clue,” our very own essays editor, Roxane Gay, writes in a piece featured on Salon. As people pore over court transcripts, interviews, and rumors to draw their own conclusions about the incident, Roxane suggests that we take a step back to consider questions that are broader in scale.

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Ashley Farmer Release Party in SF

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If you live in the Bay Area, you owe it to yourself to make it out to this release party for Ashley Farmer’s book Beside Myself, out from our essays editor Roxane Gay‘s own Tiny Hardcore Press.

THP—and its associated litmag, PANK—are celebrating the new title at the Make-Out Room in San Francisco, where they’ll be joined by our friends at the Believer. Readers will include Daniel Levin Becker, Rumpus contributors Ethel Rohan and Sarah Marshall, and Rumpus pal Matthew Zapruder.

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A Book Review Column That Isn’t All About White Men

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As VIDA’s annual stats have made very clear, most publications favor male writers reviewing books by other male writers.

Our inimitable essays editor Roxane Gay has also talked about the lack of representation of writers of color in many publications.

Ron Hogan, who runs the literary website Beatrice, wants to help change that by starting a new book-review column that intentionally focuses on the work of a diverse range of authors.

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“Diversity Does Bring About Positive Change”

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After public pressure came to a head, Saturday Night Live finally added a black woman to its cast: Sasheer Zamata, a comedian, actress, and veteran of improv group the Upright Citizens’ Brigade.

Our essays editor Roxane Gay wrote an essay for Time about Zamata’s debut episode and what it means for diversity, representation, and the cultural perception of women of color:

I held my breath and hoped she was good enough while knowing, deep down, that for a woman in her position, there is no such thing as good enough.

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AWP Offsite Event: Rumpus by the Sound

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RumpusByTheSound_WEBFLYER2

The Rumpus proudly presents…

Rumpus by the Sound

Thursday, February 27, 2014
Doors at 8:30 p.m., show at 9:00 p.m.

Spitfire
2219 4th Avenue
Seattle, WA

Our offsite AWP event is sure to be one of the after-hours highlights of the conference.

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Fictional Characters Are Not Your Friends

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Critics who fault a character’s unlikability cannot necessarily be faulted. They are merely expressing a wider cultural malaise with all things unpleasant, all things that dare to breach the norm of social acceptability.

In a cheekily titled BuzzFeed Books essay, “Not Here to Make Friends,” our essays editor Roxane Gay talks about the knotty issue of “likable characters”—why do they vex so many readers, especially when they’re female characters?

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When a man finds his feminist voice

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Daniel Jose Older has an essay in the Feminists of Color series over at Salon that is curated by Rumpus editor Roxane Gay. Daniel talks about finding his voice as a feminist:

“I was immersed in the gender violence prevention world back then: a stifling, corporate environment of almost entirely white women that had no room for conversations about white supremacy or privilege.

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Rumpus Writers Help Define Modern Literature

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Flavorwire’s Jason Diamond has compiled a list of fifty books that defined the past five years of literature.

From the universally acclaimed (Wolf Hall) to the controversial (what purpose did i serve in your life), from the literary heavyweights (Tenth of December) to the pop-culture juggernauts (The Hunger Games), these books “show what is great about literature here and now.”

We’re psyched to see that the list includes Wild by our Dear Sugar columnist Cheryl StrayedAyiti by our essays editor Roxane GayWhen the Only Light is Fire by Rumpus pal Saeed Jones, and a host of other books by Rumpus interviewees, book-club authors, and friends.

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Roxane Gay on the Joys and Perils of Twitter

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When we debate modernity, we tend to engage in all-or-nothing propositions. Technology is either wholly good or wholly destructive. Somewhere between these two extremes is where we will find the truth.

Our rock-star essays editor Roxane Gay has an essay titled “What Twitter Does” up at Editorially‘s new “writers’ journal on culture and technology,” STET.

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Roxane Gay Fights the Good Fight

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The Los Angeles Times has a great overview of our essays editor Roxane Gay’s latest efforts to spread diversity in the publishing world:

“We can’t think of gender without also considering race, class, sexuality and ability,” Gay says. “As long as we keep thinking of diversity as, ‘Oh, we need more women’ or ‘Oh, we need more people of color,’ we’re not even beginning to understand diversity.

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Staving-off-Despair Roundup

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When there’s an injustice as great a man walking free after killing an unarmed teenager, at least we have writing to turn to.

Our essays editor Roxane Gay has done some of that writing for Salon in a piece about the George Zimmerman trial titled “Racism is every American’s problem.”An essay or an Op-Ed won’t solve anything,” she says.

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The Real Reason We’re Shocked About Paula Deen

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When the transcript of Food Network host Paula Deen’s trial for workplace harassment was leaked, the reaction was nearly universal: “Hoo boy, is that woman unbelievably racist!”

Or was there something else that bothered us about Deen’s behavior? In an incisive essay at Salon, Rumpus essays editor Roxane Gay argues that it wasn’t so much the racism that shocked us, but rather the breaking of social rules about disguising racism:

This entire debacle reveals that there are unspoken rules around racism.

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Step Aside, Dashiell Hammett

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If you like your detectives hardboiled and your femmes fatale, you’ll dig Flavorwire’s list of ten essential neo-noir authors.

From Dennis Lehane (author of Shutter Island and Mystic River) to Lindsay Hunter (the heir apparent to Mary Gaitskill’s throne), these writers incorporate elements of mystery and horror without letting the strictures of genre limit them.

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“so I took a deep breath and I jumped”

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Roxane Gay isn’t just for adults.

Rookie Mag’s online issue, currently themed “Age of Innocence,” just posted the new(ish — the original was published in Prairie Schooner) beautiful story on teenage love and two different “first” times. So far the teen press can’t stop raving: “This is taking me forever to read because it’s so good I keep pausing so I can save the rest for later.

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