Posts Tagged: Rumpus Book Club

The Daily Beast Loves The Rumpus Book Club

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And we love you back.

While I’m at it, a little update news. Our current book is Kathleen Alcott’s The Dangers of Proximal AlphabetsBookslut covered it here and said “It’s never simple, but if complicated is what produces a novel like this one, we should be grateful for the messy, the broken, and the quiet graces they birth, the camaraderie that can find us in even the most isolating of nightmares.”

We’re very excited to announce that our October book is Jami Attenberg’s The Middlesteins.

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A Rumpus Book Club Update

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Rumpus Book Club members this month have been devouring Emma Straub’s Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures, and we’ll be chatting with Straub about her book this Wednesday night. Poetry Book Club members have been all over Mary Jo Bang’s new translation of Dante’s Inferno, and we’ll be chatting with her on Thursday.

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Diane Williams Interview

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January’s Rumpus Book Club selection is Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty, by Diane Williams. This 2008 Believer interview with Williams is not to be missed.

“I said that literature ought not to be the haven for tea time conversation, for polite speech—that most of us are nearly obliterated by all of our opportunities for polite speech, that without the resources of dreams and literature—and psychoanalysis for the lucky few—the consequences are surely dire.”

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January’s Rumpus Book Club Pick

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We are excited to announce that this month’s Rumpus Book Club selection is Vicky Swanky Is a Beauty by Diane Williams. You can get a sneak peek of four of the book’s stories over at McSweeney’s. Join the Book Club to get in on the action and read all fifty short stories, which “hum with tension, each one so taut that it threatens to snap and send the whole thing sprawling.”

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There’s Still Time to Get Love and Shame and Love!

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November’s Book Club selection is Love and Shame and Love (Little, Brown), a novel by Peter Orner (whose column you can follow here on the Rumpus). Orner traverses three generations of the Popper family, through which he considers the intricate realities of the American family.  The esteemed and hilarious Daniel Handler called it “epic like Gilgamesh and epic like a guitar solo,” which is both apt and all-encompassing praise.

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September’s Rumpus Book Club Selection

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The Rumpus Book Club is closing out summer and welcoming the fall with advanced copies of Show Up, Look Good, our highly-anticipated September selection.

Written by Mark Wisniewski and published by Gival Press, this novel has been reaping in a ton of laudatory blurbs from veteran writers like Jonathan Lethem (who calls Wisniewski’s book, “riotously original”).

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Digital/Print Hybrids

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Melville House Publishing (the indie publishers behind last month’s Rumpus Book Club selection) are getting technologically innovative with their releases.

They’re launching HybridBooks, a program that dabbles in e-book trendiness as a compliment to printed publications. Readers have access to supplemental electronic material (called “illuminations”) when they scan the barcode on their books.

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Reviews for the last book we featured in our Rumpus Book Club!

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Are you a part of the Rumpus book club? Remember last month’s book, Christopher Boucher’s debut novel How to Keep Your Volkswagen Alive?

Well, its starting to get great reviews out there.  This post on The Millions has referred to the novel as “a surrealist’s guide” full of strange, dazzling, yet heartwarming prose that seems to pleasantly surprise many readers who were initially skeptical of the novel’s surrealist bent.

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August’s Rumpus Book Club Selection

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August is upon us. This new month brings with it an exciting Rumpus Book Club selection—Alex Shakar’s Luminarium, published by Soho Press.

The synopsis is as intriguing as the praise it’s been garnering. Dave Eggers offered his praise, calling it “funny, and soulful, and very sad, but so intellectually invigorating you’ll want to read it twice.” The novel follows the story of two brothers—Fred and George, CEOs living in New York.

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