Posts Tagged: salon

Don’t Throw the Clichés out with the Bath Water

By

Most people think clichés aren’t worth a hill of beans, but over at Salon, Orin Hargraves says they just haven’t gotten a fair shake. Hargraves thinks clichés are just a red herring; if you want to make sure your writing really is one-of-a-kind, he has this advice:

The best way to free your speech and writing of unneeded and detrimental clichés is to construct it thoughtfully, paying close attention to the common tendency to insert a ready form of words in a place where it easily fits.

...more

Party of One

By

Social media is a cruel machine, propelled by our desire to keep up appearances and affirmed by a strange, voyeuristic capital of likes and favorites. While Facebook can at times feel like a digital cocktail party devoid of any significant personal connection, Julia Fierro, author of Cutting Teeth, makes a case for its value to those who struggle with anxiety and loneliness:

It is socializing on my own terms.

...more

The Salinger Year

By

My time at the Agency and reading Salinger brought me back to that state when you’re a kid or an adolescent – or just a person! – who reads for pleasure. I was able to go back to the pre-academic me who fully understood the actual pure power of literature to change a person’s life, to guide a person through life, or to allow a person to live fully.

...more

Love (or Something), Virtually

By

And the winner of Best Opening Line Ever goes to: “I was a gay man playing ‘Warcraft’ as a beautiful woman, and he was a Mormon virgin. Our romance was a time bomb.”

Over at Salon, Elliot Glen tells the story of his pixel-mediated relationship with a callow, straight, Mormon virgin:

I first met SaltySaber in a dark and dangerous swamp, where he answered my desperate cry for help and rescued me from a gaggle of ruthless ghosts .

...more

Nothing New Under the Billboard

By

With its clean, careful shots and enigmatic plot resolutions, Mad Men tends to inhabit a liminal narrative space, as if the same rules of decorum that govern its romanticized 60s society extend their authority to the show’s refined formal characteristics. This aversion to definitive conclusion is no accident: writing for Salon, Rebecca Makkai examines how the series recalls John Cheever’s iconic short fiction, which creator Matthew Weiner has listed as an influence:

I imagined all his stories to involve a businessman who got off the evening train drunk, stood in his yard peering in through the windows of his own house, and had some sort of sad revelation…[but instead,] in each story, a small world of alienation and humor and despair, a meditation on family or work, the city or the suburbs, travel or stasis, success or failure.

...more

Rumpus Round-Up: All the Abramson News Fit to Print

By

Jill Abramson, the first woman to head the New York Times as executive editor, was abruptly fired Wednesday and replaced by managing editor Dean Baquet.

The New Yorker attempted to explain why, with the leading theory being Abramson’s discovery several weeks ago that she earned less than her male predecessor.

...more

One Hundred Years of Dublin

By

Gather round, ye James Joyce devotees: Mark O’Connell has an essay (replete with some pretty nifty info-graphics) up at Salon on the Dublin of the past and present:

Everyone in Dubliners is thinking about a way out, if not actively pursuing one; everyone is dreaming of some better version of himself in some better place. The stories are filled with vague conjurings of such better places—the Wild West in “An Encounter”; the hazily evoked Orient in “Araby”; Buenos Aires in “Eveline”; London and Paris in “A Little Cloud”—but what seem like possibilities of escape always turn out to be passages to deeper entrapment.

...more

The Evils of Irony

By

At one time, irony served to reveal hypocrisies, but now it simply acknowledges one’s cultural compliance and familiarity with pop trends. The art of irony has lost its vision and its edge. The rebellious posture of the past has been annexed by the very commercialism it sought to defy.

...more

The Microphone on the Radio Tower

By

Marina Keegan died in a car accident just five days after she graduated from Yale University. But her writing lives on, and lends an empathetic voice to the often tedious discussions of millennials. From her posthumous essay, “Song for the special,” in Salon:

Every generation thinks it’s special — my grandparents because they remember World War II, my parents because of discos and the moon.

...more

Money Problems

By

Reading, writing and thinking are all tasks that are nearly impossible to cultivate while performing manual labor. As Plato first noted, when discussing education, “sleep and exercise are unpropitious to learning,” and therefore students should avoid intense exercise as they pursue educational endeavors.

...more

The Age of Knowledge

By

Lately, the news about Woody Allen has been flooding social media outlets. It’s “as if we are playing a national game of Clue,” our very own essays editor, Roxane Gay, writes in a piece featured on Salon. As people pore over court transcripts, interviews, and rumors to draw their own conclusions about the incident, Roxane suggests that we take a step back to consider questions that are broader in scale.

...more

Nice to “Meet” You

By

In an essay featured on Salon, Debra Sparks recounts the events surrounding her 13 year old son’s first rendez-vous with a girl he met while playing a computer game called “Minecraft.” Sparks’s essay raises questions regarding the possibility of forging virtual friendships, and how these relationships compare to those that take root in “real life.”

 Sparks writes, “Aidan’s parameters when it comes to the real world and the cyberworld are not my own, and even if I want to change that, I can’t.”

There is some comfort to be found in the final line of Sparks’s piece.

...more

The Book As a Luxury Item

By

All hailed the e-book for its innovations in technology. Embedded links, comments, and multi-media elements were what is supposed to kill the physical book. This recent essay at Salon contends that now that e-books are essentially being stripped down to resemble physical books, the real book is now considered a luxury item.

...more