Posts Tagged: salon

Reading YA Lit as an Act of Resistance

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These and many other stories hope to remind us that the freedom to choose our own reading is a form of resistance against the looming threat of a totalitarian state…

YA literature has situated itself as one of the most influential genres in publishing, with more adults reading YA than ever, and young adults being the most “literate” demographic.

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Writerly Conversation

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In a Salon interview, authors Teddy Wayne and Alexandra Kleeman talk to each other about their recent books, character- and world-building, and alienation and anxiety in their novels. “Every story I write begins with a different distribution of knowns and unknowns, which I try to assess before I begin writing,” Kleeman says.

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The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

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Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother. ...more

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Heather Havrilesky

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We are in a chaotic mess of a world, and our lives are going to be chaotic messes no matter how victorious and shiny we manage to become. ...more

Women Writers Lost and Found

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Henry James found in the stories of Constance Fenimore Woolson “a remarkable minuteness of observation and tenderness of feeling on the part of one who evidently did not glance and pass, but lingered and analyzed.”

There’s a roll call of rediscovered and canonical women writers at Salon

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The Rumpus Interview with Bruce Bauman

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Bruce Bauman discusses his latest book, Broken Sleep, why rock isn’t dead (yet), how humor makes life bearable, and why we should reinstate the draft. ...more

Reading Mixtape feature

Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #18: A Valentine: Fab Books by Fab Lit Citizens

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I’m just back from Iowa, writing about the Democratic Caucus for Salon. You know what will make you think about citizenry? Watching hundreds of working-class union members standing in the harsh wind and freezing rain waiting to get in to a Hillary Clinton rally in an overheated high school gym in Cedar Rapids.

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The Rumpus Interview with Debra Monroe

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Debra Monroe talks about her new memoir, My Unsentimental Education, the future of the genre, and how the Internet has changed what it means to be human. ...more

Exposure Doesn’t Pay Your Rent

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Last week, author and Star Trek actor Wil Wheaton wrote an essay about the seven things he did to reboot his life. The Huffington Post, a publisher recently purchased by Verizon Communications for $4.4 billion, offered Wheaton the opportunity to republish the essay in exchange for the “unique platform and reach our site provides.” Wheaton declined.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Brodawg Branding

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Behold: the “Cool Girl” of commercials. ...more

Topless Bookclub

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The Outdoor Co-ed Topless Pulp Fiction Appreciation Society is a New York-based book club founded five years ago. The club, with dozens of members, meet bare-chested in public places around the city. New York law allows women to be topless anywhere men can be, and the book club takes advantage of the fact to challenge expectations and the double standards of gender norms.

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A Memo to Exclusionary Feminists

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Feminists should accept and embrace Caitlyn and all trans and gender non-conforming people and see them wherever they define themselves on a broad gender spectrum.  The project of ending misogyny and patriarchy is one that not only inextricably includes them, but should center around trans women, because the violence and rejection society throws at them is not for being a man, but for being an othered woman.

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Irony Genius Vs. Realism Hero

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If Franzen is our genius realist, and DFW our genius postmodernist — how might they meld irony and sincerity?

In an excerpt over at Salon from his new book, Keep It Fake: Inventing an Authentic Life, Eric G. Wilson talks irony, realism, postmodernism, David Foster Wallace, and Jonathan Franzen.

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Word of the Day: Miasma

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(n.); noxious exhalations from putrid organic matter; poisonous effluvia or germs polluting the atmosphere; a dangerous, foreboding, or deathlike influence or atmosphere

“If the Internet is a bridge to the greater world, a troll is the beast who lives under it, extracting a toll in hurt feelings, outraged sensibilities and fear from all who pass.”

–Laura Miller, “We’re All Trolls Now”

If you’ve ever had occasion to visit an online discussion forum—be it the comment section of your local newspaper or a niche community of Northeastern birdwatchers—you’ve likely encountered the nasty phenomenon of the Internet troll.

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When It Rains, It Pours

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Whether you’re singing, dancing, or making out with Spiderman, there’s something different about doing things in the rain. In an excerpt from her book Rain: A Cultural and National History published at Salon, Cynthia Barnett analyzes rain as a narrative device:

Rain is such a compelling literary and cinematic trope that it’s easily and often overdeployed, as many critics have mirthfully pointed out.

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Show Me the Money

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It’s no secret that writing doesn’t pay. Ann Bauer wants to talk about where the money comes from:

In my opinion, we do an enormous “let them eat cake” disservice to our community when we obfuscate the circumstances that help us write, publish and in some way succeed…I do have a huge advantage over the writer who is living paycheck to paycheck, or lonely and isolated, or dealing with a medical condition, or working a full-time job.

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In the Name of Fear

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It’s very hard to imagine a president getting up and talking about how damaging the fear of terrorism has been to us, culturally and politically, and how much it’s horribly undermined us. Looking at torture and all the other things that have been done in the name of counterterrorism, it’s really quite disturbing what we’ve done in the name of our own fear.

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Getting Difference Wrong

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In an interview with Salon, the always-wise Roxane Gay offers her opinions on Bill Cosby, Lena Dunham, and the challenges of writing characters whose experiences differ from one’s own:

We can imagine spaceships and different planets and aliens, but when it comes to writing about someone who is of a different race or a different gender or a different sexuality then all of a sudden we’re very confused…I think that it’s terrifying to worry about getting difference wrong.

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