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Posts Tagged: salon

The Evils of Irony

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At one time, irony served to reveal hypocrisies, but now it simply acknowledges one’s cultural compliance and familiarity with pop trends. The art of irony has lost its vision and its edge. The rebellious posture of the past has been annexed by the very commercialism it sought to defy.

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The Microphone on the Radio Tower

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Marina Keegan died in a car accident just five days after she graduated from Yale University. But her writing lives on, and lends an empathetic voice to the often tedious discussions of millennials. From her posthumous essay, “Song for the special,” in Salon:

Every generation thinks it’s special — my grandparents because they remember World War II, my parents because of discos and the moon.

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Money Problems

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Reading, writing and thinking are all tasks that are nearly impossible to cultivate while performing manual labor. As Plato first noted, when discussing education, “sleep and exercise are unpropitious to learning,” and therefore students should avoid intense exercise as they pursue educational endeavors.

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The Age of Knowledge

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Lately, the news about Woody Allen has been flooding social media outlets. It’s “as if we are playing a national game of Clue,” our very own essays editor, Roxane Gay, writes in a piece featured on Salon. As people pore over court transcripts, interviews, and rumors to draw their own conclusions about the incident, Roxane suggests that we take a step back to consider questions that are broader in scale.

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Nice to “Meet” You

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In an essay featured on Salon, Debra Sparks recounts the events surrounding her 13 year old son’s first rendez-vous with a girl he met while playing a computer game called “Minecraft.” Sparks’s essay raises questions regarding the possibility of forging virtual friendships, and how these relationships compare to those that take root in “real life.”

 Sparks writes, “Aidan’s parameters when it comes to the real world and the cyberworld are not my own, and even if I want to change that, I can’t.”

There is some comfort to be found in the final line of Sparks’s piece.

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The Book As a Luxury Item

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All hailed the e-book for its innovations in technology. Embedded links, comments, and multi-media elements were what is supposed to kill the physical book. This recent essay at Salon contends that now that e-books are essentially being stripped down to resemble physical books, the real book is now considered a luxury item.

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When a man finds his feminist voice

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Daniel Jose Older has an essay in the Feminists of Color series over at Salon that is curated by Rumpus editor Roxane Gay. Daniel talks about finding his voice as a feminist:

“I was immersed in the gender violence prevention world back then: a stifling, corporate environment of almost entirely white women that had no room for conversations about white supremacy or privilege.

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Roxane Gay Fights the Good Fight

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The Los Angeles Times has a great overview of our essays editor Roxane Gay’s latest efforts to spread diversity in the publishing world:

“We can’t think of gender without also considering race, class, sexuality and ability,” Gay says. “As long as we keep thinking of diversity as, ‘Oh, we need more women’ or ‘Oh, we need more people of color,’ we’re not even beginning to understand diversity.

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Even More Barriers to Women Writers’ Success

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It’s not just the frighteningly misogynistic diatribes in the comments section—several other forces conspire to make life harder for female writers and journalists.

For example: “The most successful branded journalists stake out provocative claims frequently and aggressively, without worrying too much about whether they’ll eventually be proved wrong,” but for women, eventually being proven wrong can be a devastating career setback.

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Down with Women’s Stories, Up with Stories about Women

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I am not tired of stories about women’s lives, stories that tell me something real about how a particular woman thinks or works or loves. But I am tired of “women’s stories,” stories that are supposed to be about a problem that afflicts “women.”

Anna North has a terrific essay up at Salon about the endless conveyor belt of “women’s stories” expressing uneasiness with women who have casual sex or prioritize careers over marriage.

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We Still Have A Long Way to Go

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A grim reminder of one of the reasons we still need things like International Women’s Day: the suggestion that men should take responsibility for not raping women is apparently outrageous.

At Salon, Mary Elizabeth Williams tells the story of Zerlina Maxwell, who appeared on Sean Hannity’s show to say, “If you train men not to grow up to become rapists, you prevent rape.” The sadly predictable result: “I can’t even go on my Facebook page,” says Maxwell.

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