Posts Tagged: science

The Rumpus Interview with Jonathon Keats

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Experimental philosopher Jonathon Keats discusses Buckminster Fuller, three-wheeled cars, domed cities, climate change, and cameras with a 100-year exposure time.

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Weekly Geekery

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Is HBO’s bookish Westworld poised to give science fiction the Game of Thrones treatment? Antelopes, Bollywood, climate change, Brönte. National Geographic‘s autumn book recommendations—sushi, hiking, murder, oh my! Elon Musk name-drops Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. (Also, we’re going to Mars?) Spotting dementia through diction in Agatha Christie.

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The Rumpus Interview with Bronwen Dickey

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Bronwen Dickey discusses Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon, her examination of one of the most feared dog breeds, how the media changes perceptions, and what Eliza Doolittle might have to say about this.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Michael Helm

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Michael Helm about his new novel After James, the line between paranoia and caution, and the use of poetry as a plot device.

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Weekly Geekery

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Science fiction has a huge race problem, and stock solutions don’t cut it. You’re welcome: 19th century math genius gets Hamilton-ized. The electrifying history of modern fencing. Ah, Ancient Greece. Land of democracy—and human sacrifice? Controversy over a canonical character in neuroscience.

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Tech, Humanity, Language, and Romance

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For JSTOR Daily, Matt Langione reviews the current state of artificial intelligence, and the strides AI technology must make to fully complement human thought and experience. The latest step, Langione notes, is the news that Google began improving its “natural language algorithms” with the text of romance novels, which opens the question of what kind […]

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The Only Way to Travel

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A new exhibit, Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction 1780–1910, is on view at the newly renovated Smithsonian Libraries Gallery at the National Museum of American History. The exhibit explores the imaginations of 18th and early 19th century science fiction writers like H.G. Wells, Jules Verne, and Mary Shelley.

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The Rumpus Interview with Bernadette Murphy

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Bernadette Murphy on her forthcoming book, Harley and Me: Embracing Risk on the Road to a More Authentic Life, the challenges of selling a memoir, and life beyond “the suburban-wife-mother picture.”

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The Case for Including More Female Scientists in Literature

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If female characters are restricted to the roles of artist, dancer, waitress, or barista, their potential to generate fiction that explores existentially rich and original worlds also seems restricted. In the ongoing discussion of groups in sore need of better representation in today’s storytelling, Eileen Pollack urges writers to consider writing about female scientists in fiction. […]

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Mapping the Brain

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Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley published a new study about brain activity in people listening to podcasts, the New York Times reported. “Using novel computational methods, the group broke down the stories into units of meaning: social elements, for example, like friends and parties, as well as locations and emotions. They found that […]

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Mary Somerville: Journalist, Scientist

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Matthew Wills revisits the life and career of Mary Somerville, a 19th century scientist, translator, and a popular science journalist. Somerville also has a notable place in linguistic history: the word scientist was first used in a review of her book, On the Connexion of the Physical Sciences, in 1834.

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The Ache for Order

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Nowhere do we crave order, and the powerful results reaped from that order, more than in nature. The mapping of the seasons permitted the development of agriculture. The ability to predict the swing of pendulums led to the creation of pendulum clocks. The repeatable production of T-lymphocytes, or T-cells, when exposed to the vaccinia virus […]

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