Posts Tagged: science

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The Saturday Rumpus Review of The Martian

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It is the story of an astronaut stranded on Mars for about a year, all by himself. ...more

Adapting to Eco-Futurism

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Ben Mauk interviews Pinar Yoldas for Guernica about her ecological-themed visual art, part of a style Yoldas has dubbed “eco-futurist” (rather than the more current trend of “cli-fi” art). Where some environmentally-conscious writing and art views humanity’s effects on nature as the end of an ecosystem, Yoldas uses the state of an ecosystem as a starting-off point for how nature will adapt and evolve in response to human interference.

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Apocalypse Now

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Take that, Mom and Dad. Turns out studying literature can be practical. The Atlantic looks at the evolution of climate fiction, a new genre that’s getting readers interested in environmental issues and inspiring students to study STEM subjects:

In this respect, cli-fi is a truly modern literary phenomenon: born as a meme and raised into a distinct genre by the power of social media.

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An Anti-anti-science Novel

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“It is a comfort to know how swiftly and thoroughly a civilization can crumble when nobody wants it anymore,” Rowan says early in his story…that observation is more than just a wry criticism of our current defunding of space exploration. It’s an indictment of the entire anti-scientific mindset that’s become increasingly, alarmingly prevalent in too many pockets of American society today.

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Writing Helps Writers

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Powerful writing might be just as moving for the writer as for the reader. New research is demonstrating that the old advice about writing through your problems might actually be based in science. Researchers in various studies are gauging how writing about situations can help improve them, like students writing essays about the difficulty adjusting to college.

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Jeff VanderMeer author photo by Kyle Cassidy 2014

The Rumpus Interview with Jeff VanderMeer

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Jeff VanderMeer discusses the environment, his childhood, and the conception and conclusion of his Southern Reach Trilogy. ...more