Posts Tagged: Scientific American

Word of the Day: Woofits

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(n.); an unwell feeling, particularly in the head; a moody depression; c. 1918, from Nevil Shute’s The Rose and the Rainbow

The archetype of the mad genius dates back to at least classical times, when Aristotle noted, “Those who have been eminent in philosophy, politics, poetry, and the arts have all had tendencies toward melancholia.”

“Secrets of the Creative Brain,” Nancy C.

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The Biological Challenges of E-Readers

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Traditionalists agree: There’s just something about good old-fashioned paper-and-glue books that e-readers can’t recreate.

According to this Scientific American article, that “something” may be the way our brain processes written words as physical objects in “a kind of physical landscape.”

Although e-readers like the Kindle and tablets like the iPad re-create pagination—sometimes complete with page numbers, headers and illustrations—the screen only displays a single virtual page: it is there and then it is gone.

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A Scientific Pronoun Revelation

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“Men and women use language differently because they negotiate their worlds differently. Across dozens and dozens of studies, women tend to talk more about other human beings. Men, on the other hand, are more interested in concrete objects and things.”

An article in Scientific American is towing the line between linguistics and psychology, deconstructing the differences in how we use language.

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