Posts Tagged: screenwriting

Pulling the Thread Through: Talking with Tina Alexis Allen

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Tina Alexis Allen discusses her memoir, HIDING OUT.

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The Reality of Love: Talking with Adrian Todd Zuniga

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Adrian Todd Zuniga discusses his debut novel, COLLISION THEORY.

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The Rumpus Interview with Joe Ide

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Joe Ide discusses his debut novel, IQ his writing process, and why he enjoys fly fishing.

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The Rumpus Review of Bridget Jones’s Baby

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Perhaps Bridget fans who watched the movies but never read the books might not find this movie to be such a hard blow… But those who read the books—and those who loved the pilgrim soul in Bridget—will feel the loss more keenly.

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The Rumpus Interview with Austin Bunn

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Austin Bunn talks about his new story collection, The Brink, his latest script for a short film, In the Hollow, working in multiple mediums, and why some novels read like early drafts of screenplays.

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Women Are More Interesting

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Nick Hornby often ends up fielding questions from fans eager to understand why he frequently writes about women, especially since he’s a man. Many of his novels feature female protagonists, and his second career as a screenwriter includes what he calls the “young girl trilogy.” It’s not a coincidence that women are the center of […]

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The Loneliest Art

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Does screenwriting qualify as “real” writing? Over at the New Yorker, Richard Brody wonders what F. Scott Fitzgerald’s failed shot at Hollywood reveals about film as an industry and as an art: Fitzgerald was undone by his screenwriting-is-writing mistake. It’s a notion that has its basis in artistic form. Look at Fitzgerald’s books: they are […]

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The Un-formulaic Life of the Man Who Invented the Movie Formula

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Wycliffe A. Hill is the grandfather of the cookie cutter Hollywood movie.  Author of Ten Million Photoplay Plots: The Master Key to All Dramatic Plots, which was published in 1919, Hill created an assembly line approach to writing screenplays: character + dramatic situation + setting  = movie. For example: “An old man wrongfully accused of […]

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