Posts Tagged: segregation

These Places Surround Me: Talking with Quintan Ana Wikswo

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Quintan Ana Wikswo discusses her novel, A Long Curving Scar Where the Heart Should Be, delving into the facets of trauma, and her creative processes.

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The Lens Magnifies, the Mirror Reflects: What Photos from the Race War Show Us about Ourselves

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[Still photos] grab what otherwise might feel too foreign to understand.

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There Is Simply No Time for This: Whose Streets? and Civil Rights Cinema

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It is unlikely I will see the US justice system evolve toward an egalitarian ideal in my lifetime. But Whose Streets? does offer a clearly visible North Star.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 15): “Southern History”

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We can’t hide from our history and we can’t pass it on to future generations.

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The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Nikki Wallschlaeger

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Nikki Wallschlaeger discusses her new collection Crawlspace, why she chose to work with the sonnet form, and how segregation in American never ended.

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On Suffering and Sympathy

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What is the distance between sympathy and action? How do we travel from one to the other?

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R.I.P.: Odd Habits

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I would really like to see a coming back or recreation of funeral rites. Let’s create new ones. Let’s take this matter into our own hands.

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When the Libraries Got Desegregated

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While Brown vs. Board of education immortalized schools as the site where the historic shift to desegregation happened, few would remember the other locales of everyday life that were also once segregated spaces. For Lit Hub, Cynthia R. Greenlee writes on the importance of libraries being desegregated and the fights that had to be fought to make […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Asali Solomon

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Asali Solomon discusses her debut novel, Disgruntled, narrative structure, the mythology of memory and place, and returning to Philadelphia after years away.

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Baltimore, Offline

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Social media’s role in all this is especially strange in that it makes people feel obligated to speak out, whether they’ve thought hard about their place in the discourse or not.

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The Conversation: Hanif Willis-Abdurraqib and Paul Tran

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The sitting down to write, convincing myself that my voice matters, even though there are so many telling me that it doesn’t.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Defeat

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It never occurred to me to try to write poems without the guidance of other poets and poems.

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History in Color

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At Hyperallergic, Chris Cobb explores new photography exhibits featuring over 200 color photos from a recently rediscovered collection by Gordon Parks. The collection dates from 1956, when Parks was commissioned by LIFE magazine to capture the day-to-day of black families in segregated Alabama. Only about thirty of the original 200+ color photos ever made it into the magazine.

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The Rumpus Interview with Margo Jefferson

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Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson talks about her new memoir, Negroland, and about growing up in an elite black community in the segregated Chicago of the 1950s and 1960s.

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A Literature Divided

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Over at Lit Hub, Calvin Baker laments the segregated state of American literature in the 21st century—a result, he says, of literary institutions’ conformity to the status quo: The status quo imagines itself humanist and enlightened, but is anchored by fear and conformity. An interlocking system of publishing conglomerates, universities and media that have been […]

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