Posts Tagged: sexism

The Rumpus Interview with Jessica Valenti

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Jessica Valenti discusses her memoir, Sex Object, how the experiences she touches on in her book shaped her, and how she discovered herself outside of those experiences. ...more

FUNNY WOMEN #147: Marketing Roundtable at Skinny Cow

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But is this implying enough that thin is the final message? I'm not sure. Sexy, we've nailed. But how do we make it clear thin is the goal? ...more

What I’ll Tell My Children: On Being ‘F***Able’ under the Regime of President-elect

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It’s time to take responsibility for compliancy. ...more

Trump Dads: A Confession

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Mine wears short shorts while he jogs, with a baseball cap over his baldness, and no shirt.

His comes home from work and changes into a full gray sweatsuit, then sits at the head of the kitchen table to relax by eating a block of cheddar cheese.

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The Digital Dictator

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I have existed from the morning of the world and I shall exist until the last star falls from the night –Roman emperor Gaius Caligula (AD 12–AD 41).

Part of the beauty of me is that I am very rich. –Donald Trump

President-elect Donald Trump’s vernacular has been compared to that of Adolph Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and even the unpredictable and vengeful Roman emperor Caligula.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Following last week’s election results, the writing world has been full of voices reminding us of the power of words to protest, to heighten awareness, and to effect change. Whether through poetry, essay, memoir, fiction, or otherwise, words are an important vehicle for reaching those who need support, challenging those who need to be called out, bearing witness to injustice, and raising visibility of marginalized groups.

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The Night Wash Jones Won

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Eighty years ago, Wash Jones appeared as a minor character in William Faulkner’s masterpiece on American identity and self-invention, Absalom, Absalom! From a craft perspective Jones was put in for a purpose: to demonstrate the role that white working-class men played in maintaining white supremacy among the wealthiest people in America before the Civil War, the Southern plantation class.

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From the Editors: Election 2016

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This election is critical. We are code-red. We might elect our first woman president, or we might elect a man who is at best dangerous and unqualified and at worst the end of democracy as we know it today. ...more

The Editing of Anne Frank’s Diary Was Sexist

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There’s something very unsettling about the idea of editing someone’s personal and autobiographical journal. After all, it’s supposed to be a portal into the past: Anne’s experience in the annex, exactly what happened exactly as it happened.

At The Establishment, Stephanie Watson makes the case for buying only the unabridged version of Anne Frank’s Diary—the version we’re all familiar with was sanitized of all passages about her sexuality and other gender-specific topics.

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Podcatcher #5: #GoodMuslimBadMuslim

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Podcatcher talks with Taz Ahmed and Zahra Noorbakhsh of #GoodMuslimBadMuslim about the podcast format, finding humor in absurdity, and diversity within the Muslim identity. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bronwen Dickey

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Bronwen Dickey discusses Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon, her examination of one of the most feared dog breeds, how the media changes perceptions, and what Eliza Doolittle might have to say about this. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, we all need a story with heart and teeth, a story that celebrates the glittering intelligence of women and the power of female friendship and dismantles the patriarchy while also being laugh-out-loud funny, a story with a happy ending.

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When Marketing Trumps Truth

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This is how gay-male-identifying, biological women become straight chicks. Investigative journalism morphs into emotional memoir. ...more

Call for Submissions: Emrys Journal

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“Funny Women” submissions don’t read themselves. Most of the time Assistant Regional Funny Woman Katie Burgess reads them (she wrote the infinitely funny “How to Read a Poem,” anthologized in Oxford University Press’s Humor: A Reader for Writers, and has since gone on to read slush).

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This Week in Short Fiction

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When The Bennington Review re-launched this past April after thirty years, its first issue packed a table of contents studded with prize-winning authors and exciting emerging voices. This week, to our good fortune, the biannual print publication has made several of its pieces available online, among them new short fiction from Iranian-American writer Porochista Khakpour, author of the acclaimed novels The Last Illusion and Sons and Other Flammable Objects.

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The Rumpus Review of Seoul Searching

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Seeing is a critical part of normalizing, and though it seems like a rudimentary expectation, it’s important for American audiences to see Korean-Americans simply living their lives. ...more

The Rumpus Review of Ghostbusters

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An agenda can only exist when there is a contingent opposing it. We only push for representation when so many hours and characters of wrath are poured into keeping us out. ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Heather Havrilesky

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We are in a chaotic mess of a world, and our lives are going to be chaotic messes no matter how victorious and shiny we manage to become. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Rhino Girl

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But these were not men, she realized. They were a cackle of spotted hyena, bright-toothed in the dark, and they were laughing at her. ...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #73: Prince Rogers Nelson, Guitar Player: A Symposium

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I started thinking about additional, more slantwise ways we might talk about his legacy. What if I organized a bunch of guitar players? ...more

Visible: Women Writers of Color #3: Cole Lavalais

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Cole Lavalais discusses her debut novel, Summer of the Cicadas, why she’s a huge fan of outlining, and the importance of dedicated communities for black writers. ...more

Women Writers Gain Popularity, But Men Still Lead Industry

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Women writing about women is popular right now in the publishing world—like Emma Cline, who recently released The Girls. USA Today runs through the many books about women, by women. But despite the rising popularity of these authors and the prominence of women within the publishing industry, top jobs are still held by men.

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Unlikable and Unapologetic

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Supposedly “unlikable” female characters are often the most complex, humanly flawed, and interesting ones—yet many readers are perturbed by such representations of women. In an excerpt from her collection The Geek Feminist Revolution, Kameron Hurley muses on the reasons why female protagonists are uniquely expected to be likable:

When you find yourself reading about a gun-slinging, whisky-drinking, Mad Max apocalypse hero who you’d love if it was a guy but find profoundly uncomfortable to read about when you learn it’s a woman, take a step back and ask why that is.

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The Sacred and the Profane in Knausgaard

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Is it possible to separate Knausgaard the author from Knausgaard the protagonist? At the New Republic, Tess Crain asks this question, taking a look at the series from a woman’s point of view. By her estimation, Volume 5, just out in English, explains some of Knausgaard’s problematic views on women by framing him as “a man of God”:

…what makes My Struggle so upsetting to a female reader is also exactly what may redeem it: Sex and souls are separate.

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Podcatcher #2: Rose Buddies

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Rachel and Griffin McElroy, hosts of The Bachelor fancast Rose Buddies, talk about about the problematic aspects of the show, how they stay hydrated, and what’s up with all those McElroy podcasts. ...more

Fifty Shades of Sexism

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A new academic study published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior has found that young women who read and enjoy Fifty Shades of Gray are more likely to hold sexist attitudes:

The researchers found that those who had completed at least the first book in the trilogy had “stronger ambivalent, hostile, and benevolent sexist attitudes than those who did not read books in the trilogy”.

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