Posts Tagged: Shakespeare

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The Rumpus Interview with Imbolo Mbue

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Imbolo Mbue discusses her debut novel Behold the Dreamers, teaching herself how to write a novel, and the price of the American Dream. ...more

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Barbara Berman’s 2016 Holiday Poetry Shout-Out

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Barbara Berman offers suggestions for your poetry and poetics holiday gift-giving needs. ...more

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The Old Fetal Narrative

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Maybe it has something to do with the watery world that a fetus inhabits—our words taking on the summersaulting quality of an internal water ballet. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #58: James Steven Sadwith

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A self-described “actor’s director,” James Steven Sadwith has been writing, directing, and producing television movies, miniseries, and dramas for nearly three decades—and is perhaps best known for his work on the lives of Frank Sinatra and Elvis. But for Coming through the Rye, his first feature film for the big screen, Sadwith comes closer to home, chronicling in fictional form the journey he himself embarked upon as a youth.

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Shakespeare in Boston

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Boston Public Library aims to cut through 400 years of literary analysis and explore the pages of Shakespeare’s original writings, including some of his most famous works.

The Boston Public Library has a new exhibition, “Shakespeare Unauthorized,” which features four Shakespearean folios and other artifacts, Talia Avakian reports for Travel + Leisure.

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Baby Geniuses

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The concepts of genius and IQ have long been instruments of cultural and economic control. For Slate, Dana Goldstein examines how Donald Trump has bought into these ideas:

Trump’s adoration of IQ testing recalls an especially disturbing period in the history of genius: the late 19th and early 20th century, when social scientists attempted to measure and compare people’s intelligence.

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Shakespeare Didn’t Make up as Many Words as We Think

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For the Guardian, Alison Flood writes on the bias of the Oxford English Dictionary towards “famous literary examples” instead of the actual origin, resulting in the incorrect attribution of several still-used words and phrases to Shakespeare. Flood writes that there are multitudes of evidence showing earlier usages of phrases such as “wild goose chase” and “it’s Greek to me,” citing Shakespearean scholar Dr.

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By the People, for the People

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At Guernica, Tana Wojcznick unpacks Shakespeare’s lesser-known and often-misread play, Coriolanus, to bring us s its timely political warning about populism and democracy:

It’s no accident that Coriolanus is not a favorite in America, where it’s rarely included in the mini-canon of plays each generation tends to play and re-play (such as King Lear today or Romeo and Juliet in the 1990’s).

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Jesse Lee Kercheval

The Saturday Rumpus Interview with Jesse Lee Kercheval

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I have learned to put myself, my ego, to one side and truly experience someone else’s poetry. ...more

Conceptualizing the Vagina

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At Lit Hub, Dr. Fay Bound Alberti shares an excerpt of her new book, This Mortal Coil: The Human Body in History and Culture, exploring the cultural understandings and depictions of female genitalia from Shakespeare’s “No thing” to Jamie McCartney’s The Great Wall of Vagina, and how those understandings are influenced by culture and vice versa.

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Janine Joseph

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The day the manuscript became Driving without a License was the day I said “yes” to the truth of my own life and coming-of-age experience as an undocumented immigrant. ...more

In Favor of Reading the Literary Canon

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The canon is what it is, and anyone who wishes to understand how it continues to flow forward needs to learn to swim around in it.

Responding to Yale students’ protesting the English department’s course requirements, Slate’s Katy Waldman argues that English majors should still have to read the “sexist, racist, colonialist, and totally gross” canon of English literature, in addition to a broader range of perspectives.

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The Conversation

The Conversation: Jeremy Clark and Thiahera Nurse

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I’m thinking about the difference between “I stay somewhere” and “I live somewhere.” ...more

What Country… Should Give You Harbour?

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Allison Meier writes at Hyperallergic on a speech, recently digitized by the British Library, that proves to be the only example of Shakespeare’s handwriting other than a few signatures. The excerpt comes from Sir Thomas More, a play written in collaboration, wherein the title character asks for sympathy for migrants, driven from their homes and countries.

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: How To Make Sure Your Writing Is Forgotten

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Do you really want to have to listen from the grave as students discuss your themes and scholars analyze your syntax and trace your influence? ...more

The First Bohemian

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The Public Domain Review examines the work of Elizabethan writer Robert Greene, the original Bohemian, and the first known reviewer of William Shakespeare:

Greene’s chief target was “an upstart Crow,” who “supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you”…He has a “tiger’s heart, wrapped in a player’s hyde”, unable to fully escape the stigma of first playing on the stage before he would write for it. 

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Shakespeare’s First Folio, Coming to a City Near You!

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The Folger has 82 First Folios—the largest collection in the world. It’s located several stairways down, in a rare manuscript vault. To reach them, you first have to get through a fire door … (if a fire did threaten these priceless objects, it would be extinguished not with water—never water near priceless paper—but with a system that removes oxygen from the room).

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