Posts Tagged: short fiction

Claiming Space: A Conversation with Elizabeth Crane

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Elizabeth Crane discusses her latest collection, Turf, how where she has lived has shaped her work, and why she loves writing in first-person plural. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: My Name Is Jean-Pierre and I Am Still an End Table

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I am glad to be free of that tyrant, even if it means I am an end table waddling inch-by-inch down this path on a foolish mission that might prove impossible. I may be an end table, but at least I am free. ...more

The Rumpus Mini Interview #106: Louise Marburg

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The stories [in THE TRUTH ABOUT ME], like Marburg herself, are insightful, witty, to the point, and told with her wonderfully dry sense of humor. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Carmen Maria Machado

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Carmen Maria Machado discusses her debut story collection, Her Body and Other Parties, her favorite horror writers and movies, and writing the book(s) she's always wanted to read. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: The Whole World Is Desert

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This is what I want him to think of me. The girl poised to surf a wave under the heaviness of the full moon, the ocean around her radiant with light. ...more

You’re in the Hands of a Pro: The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot by Jack Driscoll

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The characters in this collection frequently daydream about time. Children and teens want to speed it up so life can start. Grown-ups ask time to slow, or rewind to get some of it back. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Emergency Lifeboats: 24 (12 on Each Side)

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“What’s a six-letter word for ignoring truth,” she might say, without looking up from the puzzle. ...more

What If We Were Allowed to Do Anything We Wanted?: A Conversation with Clare Beams

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Clare Beams on We Show What We Have Learned and the “living strangeness” of short fiction. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #97: Peg Alford Pursell

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Peg Alford Pursell discusses SHOW HER A FLOWER, A BIRD, A SHADOW, openness, brevity, lyricism, and the benefit of dwelling in our emotions. ...more

In Between the In-Between: Talking with Jenny Zhang

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Jenny Zhang discusses her story collection Sour Heart, trying to escape the past, collective versus individual responsibility for trauma, and love as imprisonment. ...more

Bodies Testing Boundaries: The Worlds We Think We Know by Dalia Rosenfeld

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The Worlds We Think We Know by Dalia Rosenfeld is a profound debut that carefully undermines the foundational assumptions we have about other people. ...more

As Long as What Is Said Is Understood: Talking with Lesley Nneka Arimah

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Lesley Nneka Arimah discusses her debut collection What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, mother-daughter relationships, and the pleasures of genre fiction. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Achy Obejas

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Achy Obejas discusses her new collection, The Tower of the Antilles, what she's learned from translating works of others, and why we should all read poetry every day. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: The Barbecue

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Up close, the beach was disgusting and tragic. A million tiny pieces of plastic were heaped on the shore like confetti from a hundred parades, or like the real sand on the beach threw up. ...more

Making a Narrative in the Darkness: A Conversation with Samantha Hunt

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Samantha Hunt discusses her new collection, The Dark Dark, why she became a writer, and the freeing quiet of darkness. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, in a story by Akhil Sharma that will leave you devastated, an Indian woman in an arranged marriage wakes one day to discover that she loves her husband. “If You Sing Like That for Me,” originally published in the Atlantic in 1995, is available this week at Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading in conjunction with the release of Sharma’s short story collection, A Life of Adventure and Delight, which collects this story and seven others that focus on the lives of Indian protagonists as they negotiate relationships and the difficulties of the human heart.

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Rumpus Original Fiction: Grace

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After the anger came a deep, resigned sadness, as if her cruise were canceled at the last minute. She’s stuck on the shore of her life, watching everyone she loves sail into the distance. ...more

Finding Comfort in the Discomfort: Talking with Juan Martinez

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Juan Martinez discusses his debut collection Best Worst American, his relationship to the English language, and why Nabokov ruined his writing for years. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, the latest issue of Gulf Coast has a new Carmen Maria Machado short story about body acceptance—or, rather, the opposite. In “Eight Bites,” a woman decides to undergo gastric bypass surgery after her three formerly fat sisters have it done, drop the pounds, and claim ultimate happiness and freedom as a result.

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A Specific Kind of Loneliness: In Conversation with Geeta Kothari

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Geeta Kothari discusses her debut collection, American xenophobia, and the immigrant narrative. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, the online interdisciplinary project 7×7 has new work by Janice Lee, author of The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016).  7×7’s unique format pairs a writer and a visual artist to engage in a two-week long collaboration in the mode of the exquisite corpse games of the Surrealists.

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A Funny Inevitability: In Conversation with Siel Ju

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Siel Ju discusses her debut novel-in-stories, Cake Time, the difference between our online selves and real-life selves, and who she hopes will read her work. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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We’re halfway through June, and though the first day of summer isn’t technically until June 21, I think we can all agree that we’re well into the sweltering season. This week’s story captures those quintessential staples of summer—swimming pools, soft serve, bike rides, frozen Capri Suns—but it’s no typical poolside read.

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