Posts Tagged: short stories

Living in the Realm of the Subconscious: Talking with Melissa Fraterrigo

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Melissa Fraterrigo discusses her new novel-in-stories, Glory Days, writing speculative fiction, and how our formative years influence us later in life. ...more

Playing God: A Conversation with Daniel Olivas

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Daniel Olivas discusses his recent short story collection, The King of Lighting Fixtures, writing humor, and the role of religion in his work. ...more

Less Brilliant but More Profound: Denis Johnson’s The Largesse of the Sea Maiden

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[I]n Johnson’s whole protean oeuvre, more than any pair of books, Jesus’ Son and The Largesse of the Sea Maiden are like binary stars, locked in orbit, distinct but inseparable, each throwing its light upon the other. ...more

Claiming Space: A Conversation with Elizabeth Crane

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Elizabeth Crane discusses her latest collection, Turf, how where she has lived has shaped her work, and why she loves writing in first-person plural. ...more

The Rumpus Mini Interview #106: Louise Marburg

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The stories [in THE TRUTH ABOUT ME], like Marburg herself, are insightful, witty, to the point, and told with her wonderfully dry sense of humor. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Carmen Maria Machado

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Carmen Maria Machado discusses her debut story collection, Her Body and Other Parties, her favorite horror writers and movies, and writing the book(s) she's always wanted to read. ...more

Between Autonomy and Powerlessness: Her Body and Other Parties by Carmen Maria Machado

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Women’s bodies signify so much, both to ourselves and others, that inhabiting them and having ownership over them often feel like two different states of being. ...more

You’re in the Hands of a Pro: The Goat Fish and the Lover’s Knot by Jack Driscoll

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The characters in this collection frequently daydream about time. Children and teens want to speed it up so life can start. Grown-ups ask time to slow, or rewind to get some of it back. ...more

What If We Were Allowed to Do Anything We Wanted?: A Conversation with Clare Beams

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Clare Beams on We Show What We Have Learned and the “living strangeness” of short fiction. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #97: Peg Alford Pursell

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Peg Alford Pursell discusses SHOW HER A FLOWER, A BIRD, A SHADOW, openness, brevity, lyricism, and the benefit of dwelling in our emotions. ...more

In Between the In-Between: Talking with Jenny Zhang

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Jenny Zhang discusses her story collection Sour Heart, trying to escape the past, collective versus individual responsibility for trauma, and love as imprisonment. ...more

Bodies Testing Boundaries: The Worlds We Think We Know by Dalia Rosenfeld

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The Worlds We Think We Know by Dalia Rosenfeld is a profound debut that carefully undermines the foundational assumptions we have about other people. ...more

As Long as What Is Said Is Understood: Talking with Lesley Nneka Arimah

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Lesley Nneka Arimah discusses her debut collection What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, mother-daughter relationships, and the pleasures of genre fiction. ...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Achy Obejas

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Achy Obejas discusses her new collection, The Tower of the Antilles, what she's learned from translating works of others, and why we should all read poetry every day. ...more

Making a Narrative in the Darkness: A Conversation with Samantha Hunt

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Samantha Hunt discusses her new collection, The Dark Dark, why she became a writer, and the freeing quiet of darkness. ...more

Finding Comfort in the Discomfort: Talking with Juan Martinez

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Juan Martinez discusses his debut collection Best Worst American, his relationship to the English language, and why Nabokov ruined his writing for years. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, the latest issue of Gulf Coast has a new Carmen Maria Machado short story about body acceptance—or, rather, the opposite. In “Eight Bites,” a woman decides to undergo gastric bypass surgery after her three formerly fat sisters have it done, drop the pounds, and claim ultimate happiness and freedom as a result.

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A Specific Kind of Loneliness: In Conversation with Geeta Kothari

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Geeta Kothari discusses her debut collection, American xenophobia, and the immigrant narrative. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, the online interdisciplinary project 7×7 has new work by Janice Lee, author of The Sky Isn’t Blue (Civil Coping Mechanisms, 2016).  7×7’s unique format pairs a writer and a visual artist to engage in a two-week long collaboration in the mode of the exquisite corpse games of the Surrealists.

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A Funny Inevitability: In Conversation with Siel Ju

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Siel Ju discusses her debut novel-in-stories, Cake Time, the difference between our online selves and real-life selves, and who she hopes will read her work. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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For the rest of this month, Granta will be publishing the winners of the 2017 Commonwealth Short Story Prize, awarded to five writers from five regions of the globe, with the mission to connect storytellers across cultures through the power of fiction.

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Little Seizures of Grief: Talking with Gary Lutz

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Gary Lutz talks about his latest collection of short stories, Assisted Living, the author’s right of way, and the sentence. ...more

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, Oxford American has a stand-alone excerpt from Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing, her first novel since 2011’s National Book Award-winning Salvage the Bones. The excerpt, titled “Flayed,” follows a boy named Jojo in the rural Mississippi Gulf Coast as he helps his grandfather kill and butcher a goat on his thirteenth birthday.

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This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, a story at Smokelong Quarterly instructs us on how to become a new person. The title of Rebecca Bernard’s story, “How to Be Another Person in Five Days,” plays humorously with the trope of familiar self-help programs and fad diets that promise a “new you” in x amount of time, but the story itself is anything but light and fluffy.

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Worlds Full of Demons: Chavisa Woods’s Things to Do When You’re Goth in the Country

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We must ask ourselves: who stands in the shadows of our national persona, both historically and in the nation’s literature? Woods raises the question, and her work points toward an answer. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Day of the Dead

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Octavio is tired, tired of trying to separate what he remembers so vividly from the memories he can barely make out in the fog. ...more