Posts Tagged: sisters

The Dark All Around Us

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There is still light in the dark. This is the paradox that Little Bear has to accept in order to fall asleep. ...more

The Night Is Itself a Novel: Talking with Lidija Dimkovska

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Lidija Dimkovska discusses A Spare Life, living through the break-up of Yugoslavia, her writing style, and where she now feels most at home. ...more

Breaking Through: Gayle Brandeis Discusses The Art of Misdiagnosis

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Gayle Brandeis discusses her memoir, The Art of Misdiagnosis, out today from Beacon Press. ...more

Death, Memory, and Other Superpowers

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There was no cedar chest filled with tissue-wrapped rattles, handprint art projects, and bronzed baby shoes. Our parents never spoke of our missing sister. ...more

Voices on Addiction: The Honeybee

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She never stopped, a bee buzzing from flower to flower to flower, collecting all the sweetness she could. ...more

Reclaiming the Language of Pop Culture: Reversible by Marisa Crawford

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Marisa Crawford’s Reversible is an evocative collection, showcasing the ways in which pop culture saturates us with meaning, and how it teaches us to become. ...more

Saying What Shouldn’t Be Said: A Conversation with Julie Buntin

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Julie Buntin discusses her debut novel, Marlena, why writing about teenage girls is the most serious thing in the world, and finding truths in fiction. ...more

Out of the Trenches: The Rumpus Review of Wonder Woman

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If there was ever a case for women avoiding Botox, Diana’s signature skepticism for the patriarchy is it. She has never encountered womanhood as subordinate, and she’s not about to start. ...more

Allowing a Female to Own Her Genius: Talking with Alana Massey

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Alana Massey discusses her debut collection, All the Lives I Want, the best piece of writing advice she's ever received, and acknowledging the work that women do. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Naomi Jackson

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Naomi Jackson discusses her debut novel, The Star Side of Bird Hill, how she approached writing about mental illness and its affects on a family, and choosing to to tell a story from multiple perspectives. ...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Salt

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A flash-fire covered the horizon all around and behind her, and my mother glowed genuine blue. I saw her skeleton, or maybe her white-hot soul. Something flew up and around our heads. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Roxane Gay

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Roxane Gay discusses her new collection, Difficult Women, the problem with whiteness as the default and the need for diverse representation, and life as a workaholic. ...more

Letter to Jim

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Many days I couldn’t see the way forward, but I kept going, the way you had. It was you, after all, who taught me how to stay. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Kerry and Tyler Cohen

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Sisters and collaborators Kerry and Tyler Cohen talk about their new book Girl Trouble: An Illustrated Memoir, female friendships, and some of the challenges of writing memoir. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Such a Thing

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The future perfect tense indicates an action that is certain to occur. But when the future is not perfect or certain, the conditional “would” is more appropriate. ...more

An Open Letter to My Brother, A Trump Supporter

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Dear John,

I, like so many other Americans, spent the past weeks worrying, crying, and searching for the people around me that I loved so they could be beacons when I felt most battered. I did not seek you out, did not call or text you, did not respond to your victory message because I was hurt, nursing my wounds with those who felt safe to me.

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The Healing Magic of Baseball

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In that favorite summer of my memory, Mom is perched on the edge of the rickety folding chair in box seats that the team manager reserved for us. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: The Kill Shot

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1964, a month prior to the anniversary of JFK’s assassination, a different home movie shot. Infant toss. Up-down. Plummeting. I’m ten months of age—picking up speed. ...more

A Tale of Two Siblings

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For the New York Times’s Bookends column, Thomas Mallon and Leslie Jamison muse on the books that best capture the intricate and fraught relationships between siblings:

That’s what I felt Faulkner intuited about siblings: that there were all sorts of gaps and harms and distances that might befall them, that they might inflict on each other, but that they loved each other anyway.

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