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Posts Tagged: slate

The Repercussions of Modern-Day Witch Trials

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We like to think mass hysteria about black magic in the US died with the Salem witch trials, but 300 years afterward, starting in the 1980s, childcare providers across the country were accused of “Satanic abuse.”

One such case involved Fran and Dan Keller, who ran a daycare center in Austin and went to jail after being accused of using children in outlandish “Satanic rituals” involving murder, cannibalism, grave robbery, and sexual abuse.

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The Stockholm Syndrome of Sexual Assault

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For SlateAmanda Hess examines yet another first-person confessional: sexual assault victim Jenny Kutner’s essay “The Other Side of the Story,” published in  Texas Monthly.

The power of Kutner’s story is that it lends insight into a particular type of victimization—the kind that happens when the victim doesn’t see herself as one.

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The Changing Face of Sex Work

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A University of Chicago survey found that fewer men are paying for sex—or did it?

In an interview with Slate‘s Amanda Hess, Post Whore America blogger Melissa Gira Grant takes a second look at the survey results and challenges the idea that “reducing the incidence of sex work is a good thing”:

I think what too many people mean when they say they want to reduce sex work is that they don’t want to drive by a motel where they think sex work happens, or they don’t want to come across sex ads online….They’re letting how sex work makes them feel override reality, and they’re missing the point.

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Good Work from the Museum of Bad Art

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Travel blog Atlas Obscura has a post up on Slate about Massachusetts’s Museum of Bad Art, whose collection of paintings “displays a glaring gap between the artist’s sincerity and skill level.”

It may seem cruel at first, but founders Scott Wilson and Jerry Reilly explain that “[t]heir goal, and the goal of the museum to this day, was to celebrate artists’ enthusiasm and honor failure as an essential part of the creative process.”

We fail to see what could possibly be bad about a painting titled Ferret in a Brothel.

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Rest in Peace, Patriarchy

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Yesterday, Slate announced the death of the patriarchy at the age of several thousand years.

The Cut’s Kat Stoeffel has honored the dearly departed, which will be mourned by civilizations across the globe, by compiling a list of “39 Things We’ll Miss About Patriarchy, Which Is Dead.”

Some of the blessings we will now tragically be forced to live without: “Not having mandatory paid maternity leave,” “revenge porn,” and “that thing where dudes get an extra half of a seat on the subway for their balls.” Rest in peace.

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Scandal in the World of Quiz Bowl

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“Nerd culture” may be, at this point, thoroughly subsumed into the capitalist mainstream (see: The Big Bang Theory, the explosion of Comic-Con’s popularity, they’re seriously gonna make more Star Wars movies, etc.), but there’s still a group of geeks out there swapping obscure bits of knowledge for knowledge’s sake.

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A Rep. Todd Akins Roundup

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Before yesterday, I suspect most people outside Missouri had never heard of Representative Todd Akin. I barely recognized the name myself, even though I consider myself a bit of a political junkie and I currently live in the neighboring state. All I really knew is that he was beating Senator Claire McCaskill pretty handily in her re-election bid, and that the Democrats were likely to lose that seat come November.

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On Gawker’s Nastiness

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“What the Gawker ethos (i.e., the sneer) comes down to is this: Everyone is a phony, except presumably those writers at Gawker who labor tirelessly to point out this phoniness (think Holden Caulfield gone a little sour, and getting a little old).”

At Slate, Katie Roiphe critiques Gawker, providing an analysis of their mode of operations.

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Burns Gets Burned

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Remember all those VHS tapes that added up to a compendium of everlasting Civil War knowledge?

It turns out Ken Burns’ Civil War documentary series isn’t entirely accurate, but in fact, “deeply misleading and reductive.” This may feel like a betrayal for those of us who were weaned on his sentimental historical depictions, or mesmerized by the zooming in and out of battle scene paintings.

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