Posts Tagged: small press

Faith, Gods, and Gay Sex: A Conversation with Matthew Gallaway

By

Matthew Gallaway discusses his second novel, #gods, moving from a big publishing house to an indie press, and why it was important to him to depict gay sex in writing. ...more

Help Small Presses Live to Fight Another Day

By

What if you could spend a little bit of money to make sure that your favorite books from independent publishers, like Coffee House Press, Dorothy, and Copper Canyon Press, turn up at your local bookstore?

Small Press Distribution, the tiny nonprofit that makes sure your favorite indie books are stocked on store shelves, is holding a fundraiser in the form of a literary trivia contest: the first annual Battle of the Brains.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Tobias Carroll

By

Tobias Carroll discusses his newest collection Transitory, the influence of film on his writing, and getting good news at bad times. ...more

What’s at Stake: The NEA and the Literary Ecosystem

By

As a poet I get it: talking about “literary infrastructure” is boring. Who wouldn’t rather talk about poets, poems, or aesthetic movements? When we start hearing a lot about the organizations dedicated to supporting authors, presses, and readings rather than the people making literature it probably means those organizations are threatened.

...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

By

thisweekinindiebookstores

Chicago’s bookstores, bracing against the looming arrival of a physical Amazon store, are stronger than ever. Check out this roundup of local indie stores.

Fišer bookstore, a Prague institution since the 1930s, is closing.

Korea’s oldest bookstore closed fourteen years ago, but Jongno Books is set to reopen in Seoul.

...more

This Week in Books: The French Revolution: From Enlightenment to Tyranny

By

this-week-in-books

Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

...more

This Week in Books: The Red Hijab

By

this-week-in-books

Welcome to This Week in Books, a new Rumpus column that will highlight books just released by small and independent presses.

Books are more important than ever. As we head into a Trump presidency, we’re seeing attacks on basic constitutional rights, increased hate crimes, and denial of accepted science.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Leland Cheuk

By

Leland Cheuk discusses his novel The Misadventures of Sulliver Pong, dark humor, cancer, morally corrupt characters, and his mother. ...more

Not Enough Buzz to Go Around

By

At Lit Hub, Ilana Masad outlines the importance of publicists in generating buzz for new books in a social media saturated-environment, and the struggle many authors face to generate their own publicity at small presses without the resources to do more:

The difference between being published with a “Big 5” publisher versus a small or independent press is not necessarily how much work the writers have to do, but how much that work gets noticed.

...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #53: Meet WTAW Press

By

Peg Alford Pursell is the author of the forthcoming book of flash and hybrid prose, Show Her a Flower, A Bird, A Shadow (ELJ Publications). Her work has been published in VOLT, the Journal of Compressed Arts, and RHINO, among others, and shortlisted for the Flannery O’Connor Award.

...more

The Rumpus Interview with Becky Tuch

By

Becky Tuch discusses founding The Review Review, motherhood, creativity, and the future of literary magazines. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jessa Crispin

By

Jessa Crispin talks about The Dead Ladies Project and The Creative Tarot, founding Bookslut, why she has an antagonistic relationship with the publishing industry, and her estrangement from modern feminism. ...more

A Year Of Only Women

By

Men need not submit to small press And Other Stories this year, as the independent publisher plans on only printing women in 2018, reports the Guardian. And Other Stories prints 10 to 12 books a year. The decision was made in response to the revelation that less than 40% of Booker Prize submissions are written by women, and many fewer are about women, and a challenge issued by novelist Kamila Shamsie to make 2018 the year of publishing women.

...more

Is There Too Much Translation?

By

Writing over at Brooklyn Quarterly, Will Evans discusses why he founded a publishing house dedicated to translation:

In addition to being a philosophical problem, literary translation is also a contentious business matter. There are thousands of good to all-time-great books published in the world every year in every language imaginable, but only a couple hundred of those ever get published in English, and that’s in a good year.

...more

Pittsburgh, Writer’s Haven

By

“According to the Post-Gazette article, writers are realizing how great Pittsburgh is, and moving there en-masse.

“Of course, the article makes clear, it’s not about the money (there is not much)—it’s about being able to attend Encyclopedia Destructica’s weekly ‘binding parties,’ where tomes are produced ‘with a zine attitude and a book aesthetic.’

“Or stumbling upon Dirty Poet’s ‘publications,’ all of which are written on lampposts around town.

...more