Posts Tagged: sociology

MIXED FEELINGS: The Emotional Labor of Listening to Men Complain

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In the first installment of "Mixed Feelings," a science-based advice column, Mandy Catron offers counsel on handling a partner's obsession with their ex. ...more

On Suffering and Sympathy

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What is the distance between sympathy and action? How do we travel from one to the other? ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bronwen Dickey

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Bronwen Dickey discusses Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon, her examination of one of the most feared dog breeds, how the media changes perceptions, and what Eliza Doolittle might have to say about this. ...more

Sociology and Art with W. E. B. DuBois

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Allison Meier writes for Hyperallergic on the hand-drawn, recently digitized data visualizations produced by W. E. B. DuBois (in collaboration with others) to demonstrate the size and scope of black life in America at the turn of the 20th century. These sociological charts cover population percentages, property ownership, chosen fields of study and professions by black people leading up to Paris’s Exposition Universelle of 1900.

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A New Scientific History

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Did Du Bois and the Atlanta School have a distinct standpoint? Of course…. But white privileged departments of Sociology also had their distinct standpoint. And theirs was the standpoint of imperial power.

In the Berkeley Journal of Sociology, Julian Go reviews a new history of sociology (Aldon Morris’s The Scholar Denied) and the systematic dismissal of black scholars’ scientific discoveries, starting with W.E.B.

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Choice or Fate in Romance

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For Aeon, Polina Aronson writes on the different “romantic regimes” of the world, with “regime” defined as the cultural, economic, and sociological systems behind how we engage in relationships. Aronson compares the Western “Regime of Choice” with the regime in Russian culture that, until recently, bore little resemblance to one based on choice but rather on fate:

The most important requirement for choice is not the availability of multiple options.

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“The Sheer Fun of Researching” Cults

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Sociologist Susan Palmer studies new religious movements—“cults,” as the rest of us might call them—not out of morbid fascination or a desire to catalog their evils, but because she considers them “beautiful life forms, mysterious and pulsating with charisma.”

Of course, it’s a controversial line of work, and involves more than its fair share of ethical quandaries—but none of the ones you’d guess.

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