Posts Tagged: Steve Almond

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Sides of AWP

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What exactly is the purpose of AWP? To meet new or online-only writer friends? To interact with your favorite authors? To advance your own writing career with networking maneuvers and information absorbed in panel discussions? For the Rumpus’s Steve Almond, it’s a complex question, which he tries to answer in an essay for the New Republic. But […]

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Writs of Passion

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In case you missed it last week, check out Steve Almond’s “Why I Write Smut: A Manifesto.” It’s an excerpt from Writs of Passion, a set of six tiny books made up of Almond’s stories and essays that are too dirty for prime-time. The book covers fit together like a puzzle to reveal a steamy scene […]

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“Attention Is the First and Final Act of Love”

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Steve Almond’s Writs of Passion is “the best Valentine’s gift money can buy,” at least according to About.com (and us!). About.com guide Corey Silverberg interviewed Almond about pleasure, emotional danger, and how to write sex scenes. A preview: …even if we do enjoy sex, we find all kinds of ways to punish ourselves for that pleasure. I […]

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More on Memoir

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Rumpus columnist Steve Almond weighs in on Stephen Elliott’s side of the is-memoir-an-acceptable-form-of-literature debate. “[Hamilton] Nolan is right to decry this kind of cynicism,” writes Almond. “But what he gets wrong in his piece is just as important as what he gets right. The reason most people shouldn’t write about their lives, he argues, is […]

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“Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt”

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Three years ago yesterday, in honor of Kurt Vonnegut’s birthday, we reprinted Steve Almond’s homage to the late author, “Everything Was Beautiful and Nothing Hurt.” “The main thing was that Vonnegut made an impact on readers. He wasn’t one of those recluses who hid behind coy fictional guises. Every sentence he wrote, every character, was stamped in his image. […]

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Here Are Some Stories Seth Likes

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Here’s a few very short stories for your Monday morning: “When a door opens and you can’t see who’s coming, it’s almost always a cat that would like to be your lover.” — At BLIP MAGAZINE, “The Cat Lover” by Thaisa Frank.  “We sweet-lipped drag queens for clean sheets.” — At The Collagist, “And Then […]

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A Die-Hard Fan’s Lament

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Rumpus columnist Steve Almond, an unwavering Oakland Raiders fan, writes for The New York Times about being a true sports fan, specifically a fan of a floundering team: “As I prepare to immerse myself in another season of ill-fated devotion, there is a question I can’t shake: Why? Not why do the Raiders keep losing, but why […]

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Muni Anti-Muslim Ad Controversy

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Adam Serwer reports for Mother Jones on the anti-Muslim advertisements that have recently appeared on Muni vehicles. The advertisements are paid for by Pamela Geller, an anti-muslim blogger: “The ads declare that ‘in any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man’—a paraphrase of an Ayn Rand quote—while also urging readers to […]

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“Liberals Are Ruining America. I Know Because I Am One.”

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At The New York Times, Rumpus columnist Steve Almond argues that liberals are treating “for-profit propaganda as news” to the detriment of our political system. Almond makes a strong case for ignoring the demagogues and instead seeking out those who want to find common ground. “The more we devote to amplifying conflict, the less we listen […]

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Non-Awards

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Listen in to Here & Now as Rumpus columnist Steve Almond discusses the 2012 Pulitzer Prize fiction indecision–and why it may be a good thing. Almond argues that we are overly invested in literary awards and suggests that the Pulitzer process should focus on the deliberations rather than the voting. “The most fascinating thing you […]

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Fictionalizing Gadhafi

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After decades of unlimited wealth and power, Gadhafi’s on the run. Such a steep decline from rich to running can only incite the imagination. Salon.com got a slew of authors to imagine the intricacies of Gadhafi’s current reality. Steve Almond imagined the unrequited love story of Gadhafi and Condoleeza Rice. Here’s one particularly enticing passage: […]

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