Posts Tagged: Taiwan

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Books Are Magic opens in Brooklyn, making Emma Straub the latest author to open a bookstore.

Turkish police arrested seven teachers at a bookstore in a raid against dissent.

A Houston bookstore celebrated indie bookstore day with drunk coloring.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A Jordanian bookseller opened a 24-hour “Emergency Room for the Mind” that offers life-affirming literature.

One Seattle-area bookstore thinks to the key to success is more competition and is seeking out a neighboring bookstore to open nearby.

Bucharest, Romania is getting two new bookstores.

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The Rumpus Interview with Vanessa Hua

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Vanessa Hua discusses her debut collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, writing fiction in order to understand life as an American-born child of immigrants, and the importance of literary community. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Esmé Weijun Wang

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Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her first novel, The Border of Paradise, about a multi-generational new American family, creative expression through writing and photography, and interracial relationships. ...more

This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A state run bookstore in Shanghai is ripping out pages from Webster’s Dictionary that include a reference to Taiwan.

The Dallas Morning News checks in with Deep Vellum Books, the bookstore offshoot of Deep Vellum Publishing that owner Will Evans sought a business partner to keep going.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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The Feminist Bookstore made famous by Portlandia has kicked the show out, saying the show “throws trans femmes under the bus.”

Specialty bookstores are finding that filling a niche is often the best way to survive the onslaught of online competition.

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The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #54: Jade Chang on The Wangs vs. the World

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With a mix of humor, agility, and insight, Jade Chang’s debut novel, The Wangs vs. the World (HMH Books, October 2016), tells a fresh immigrant story. Charles Wang has left his native homeland to become a successful businessman in America. The book takes us on a journey with his whole family as they navigate the ups and downs of fortune and travel across the US.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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A Buffalo bookstore owner was the target of an FBI investigation for more than two years, and now he wants to know why.

Can independent bookstores survive in the state that gave us Antonin Scalia and Tony Soprano?

San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood will not, after all, be a bookstore-free zone.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Famed Indian bookseller Ram Advani has passed away at the age of 95. He had planned to continue visiting his shops until was 99.

Elton John has a favorite Los Angeles bookstore: Book Soup.

Seattle’s only bookstore dedicated to poetry is looking for a new owner.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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Bookstores in Mumbai, India are losing customers from institutional sales as large buyers turn directly to suppliers, and though 700 existing retailers exist in the city, the last few years have no seen new stores open.

A Syrian couple has opened an Arabic-language bookstore in Istanbul hoping to change cultural perceptions.

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This Week in Indie Bookstores

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To celebrate Small Business Saturday, President Obama shopped at Upshur Street Books in the Petworth neighborhood of Washington DC.

Magers & Quinn, an independent Minneapolis bookseller, has been open on Thanksgiving for the last thirteen years—mostly to provide employees without family in the area a place to be during the holiday.

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How Accurate Is Chang-Rae Lee’s New Novel?

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Perhaps American sci-fi is made to tell immigrant stories. And maybe there’s a reason why, during a 24-hour travel back to Taipei, I felt welcomed home by the collective voice of B-more.

Kevin Tang’s review of Chang-rae Lee’s On Such a Full Sea for BuzzFeed Books brings to bear his experience growing up in late-’80s Taiwan, where, despite austere living conditions and endless work hours, “we were content, and didn’t know how to protest.”

Tang seems like the perfect person to illuminate Lee’s novel about a grossly unequal futuristic America’s division between the individual and the collective.

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