Posts Tagged: tattoos

How We Cycle through Our Lives: Talking with Chelsey Clammer

By

Chelsey Clammer discusses her new essay collection, Circadian, her writing process, and the body as text.

...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #94: David Burr Gerrard

By

David Burr Gerrard’s new novel The Epiphany Machine is one of the more ambitious books you’ll read this year, centering on a device that can reveal the epiphany of your life by tattooing the words onto your arm. “ABANDONS WHAT MATTERS MOST” is just one example of the sort of permanent self-owns that get written […]

...more

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton

By

Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton on their new book Knives & Ink, cooking with pigs’ heads, and long-distance collaboration.

...more

Written in Ink

By

In a powerful essay at The Establishment, Evelyn Deshane discusses rejecting the medical narrative around transitioning, and how tattoos allowed them to reclaim their own body: When the physicality of my gender—that “place” that could be home—feels out of reach, tattoos are my way to be present in my body, and to control what happens to […]

...more

Rumpus Original Fiction: Swans and Other Lies

By

As she presses against Patterson, she feels her feet softening, losing gravity. He’s embracing her, willing her to disappear, swallowing her.

...more

All Perspectives Are Personal

By

Sarah Galo interviewed Molly Crabapple for Guernica. They talked about race, violence, innocence, and narrative voice: Lately, I haven’t been putting myself into my work that much, because I’ve just found the stories of the people I’m talking to much more interesting than my reactions to them. But I also think that, for what I […]

...more

Literature in Your Skin

By

If you need a few minutes to break away from your day, why don’t you head on over to Tattoo Lit, where the word is made flesh. It is updated regularly with submissions of tattoos inspired by literature. Virginia Woolf, Shakespere, and even Shel Silverstein are represented.

...more

Ed Hardy: Way Cooler than You Knew

By

Did you know Ed Hardy is not just a brand name, but an actual person? And that after becoming “the first Westerner to work with a traditional Japanese master” of tattoo art, he led the “current tattoo renaissance” with an emphasis on individualized expression rather than the mere copying of classic designs? For the LA Review […]

...more

Pen & Ink Seeking Submissions for Book

By

If a picture’s worth a thousand words, a tattoo might be worth a book. If that sounds like the kind of book you’d like to read, good news: Pen & Ink, the blog about tattoos and the stories behind them by Rumpus compadres Isaac Fitzgerald and Wendy MacNaughton, is jumping from web pages to paper […]

...more

Tao Lin Tells Tattoo Tale

By

If you didn’t already know, Rumpus co-owner Isaac Fitzgerald and Rumpus contributor Wendy MacNaughton run a spiffy little blog called Pen & Ink, which documents “tattoos and the stories behind them.” Today, alt-lit luminary Tao Lin reveals the meaning behind his impulsively acquired wrist tattoo. We’ll just say this: any tattoo that addresses both existential anxiety and […]

...more

History of Tattoos

By

The fact that tattoos existed in a time before “punk” was a word to describe a movement is a hard notion to grasp. The New Yorker has compiled a series of photographs of women in the early to mid 20th century baring their tattoos. Many of them were pioneering tattoo artists themselves or worked as […]

...more

The Stone of Help

By

My husband hunches over the table, picking at his quesadillas. I’m gulping the last of the water, dropping my plate in the sink with a clatter. An idea hangs in the air between us like a burnt smell. We’re arguing—or rather, we’re not arguing—about tattoos again.

...more

Inked Up Librarians

By

Mental Floss compiles tattooed librarians. As expected, much of the skin art is literary themed, but that is not to say that classic skull and bones motifs don’t make an appearance. Each tattoo’s origin is explained in detail and shed light on projects such as Brand Yourself A Librarian, which aims to unite prideful librarians. […]

...more