Posts Tagged: Texas Monthly

Slowly Converging Paths: A Conversation with Nate Blakeslee

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Nate Blakeslee discusses American Wolf: A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West, cultivating trust in his sources, and recreating action-packed scenes he did not witness. ...more

Seeing Double

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Over at Texas Monthly, Jeff Salamon chats with Attica Locke, mystery novelist, unassuming Houstonian, and Hollywood titan. They touch on code-switching, freelancing, and writing the gun scenes “all wrong”:

Black people have seen two versions of ourselves on TV: we are either the third thug on the left in the police lineup on a Law and Order episode or we’re some kind of angel maid who is there to fix some white person’s life.

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Word of the Day: Silvicide

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(n.); a special pesticide intended for killing unwanted trees and other brush

It was the kind of horrific end no one could have imagined for the demure Harkey matriarch … her death represented the final, sordid unraveling of one of the oldest lineages in Central Texas—the story of a family tree rotted through by the destructive forces of obsession, greed, and hate.

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The Repercussions of Modern-Day Witch Trials

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We like to think mass hysteria about black magic in the US died with the Salem witch trials, but 300 years afterward, starting in the 1980s, childcare providers across the country were accused of “Satanic abuse.”

One such case involved Fran and Dan Keller, who ran a daycare center in Austin and went to jail after being accused of using children in outlandish “Satanic rituals” involving murder, cannibalism, grave robbery, and sexual abuse.

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The Stockholm Syndrome of Sexual Assault

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For SlateAmanda Hess examines yet another first-person confessional: sexual assault victim Jenny Kutner’s essay “The Other Side of the Story,” published in  Texas Monthly.

The power of Kutner’s story is that it lends insight into a particular type of victimization—the kind that happens when the victim doesn’t see herself as one.

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When Hippies and Rednecks Joined Forces

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I can’t tell you how much 
these guys scared Nashville. Texans didn’t know who was boss.

Texas Monthly has a must-read oral history of the creation of a new type of country music in Austin in the ’70s.

Musicians like Steve Earle, Jerry Jeff, and, of course, Willie Nelson describe in their own words the moment when they smashed hippies and rednecks together and made magic.

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