Posts Tagged: Texas

Song of the Day: “I Left My Wallet In El Segundo”

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Road trip songs occupy a plush seat in the American canon—right underneath the fuzzy dice. They are often harbingers of summer, and “I Left My Wallet In El Segundo” is no exception. This prototypical Tribe Called Quest track from their first album features a playful and engaging narrative from standout MC, Q-Tip.

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Roots and Ragtime

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John Jeremiah Sullivan and Joel Finsel chronicle the rise, fall, and in-between wanderings of Houstonian booksellers, civil rights activists, reporters, and musicians—in oversized, Texan fashion.

Most people have heard of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, canonical English poet and laudanum addict. Far fewer know the life and work of Samuel Coleridge-Taylor. Coleridge-Taylor was a black composer, London-born, his mother a white English woman, his father a doctor from Sierra Leone.

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The Rumpus Interview with Thomas H. McNeely

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Thomas H. McNeely discusses coming of age in the 1970s, Houston's complicated racial history, and his new novel Ghost Horse. ...more

More Misogyny in Texas

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Last year, we covered Wendy Davis’s heroic attempt to prevent a draconian anti-abortion bill from passing in Texas with two phenomenal essays, one by Callie Collins and one by Amy Gentry.

Now Davis is running for governor of Texas, and you’ll be shocked—shocked!—to learn that conservatives are treating her with as much misogyny as they did during her hours-long filibuster.

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When Hippies and Rednecks Joined Forces

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I can’t tell you how much 
these guys scared Nashville. Texans didn’t know who was boss.

Texas Monthly has a must-read oral history of the creation of a new type of country music in Austin in the ’70s.

Musicians like Steve Earle, Jerry Jeff, and, of course, Willie Nelson describe in their own words the moment when they smashed hippies and rednecks together and made magic.

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The Good News and the Bad News About Libraries

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Bad news first: There are 49 libraries in Florida’s Miami-Dade County. Twenty-two of them are about to be closed. Some last-minute budget rearrangements might save six of those, but that will leave sixteen—one-third of the county’s libraries—on the chopping block.

A tax hike would have saved the libraries—along with several emergency rescue vehicles and the jobs of a few hundred county employees—but it proved too unpopular.

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Victories for Pro-Choicers, Gay Marriage; Defeat for Voting Rights

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As you’re probably aware, we’ve been covering Texas’s grotesque anti-abortion bill SB5, and we’re overjoyed to report it did not pass.

Texas State Senator (and now folk hero) Wendy Davis filibustered the bill for close to thirteen hours under the state legislature’s stringent rules: no sitting, leaning, drinking water, using the bathroom, or speaking about subjects not germane to the topic at hand.

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About That Terrifying Abortion Bill in Texas…

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Despite valiant efforts from protesters and pro-choice politicians, Texas’s state House of Representatives has “tentatively approved” the ultraconservative anti-abortion Senate Bill 5, the Texas Tribune reports. The bill

would ban abortion at 20-weeks gestation, require physicians that perform the procedure to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, require abortions to be performed in ambulatory surgical centers and require doctors administering abortion-inducing drugs to do so in person.

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