Posts Tagged: the awl

Lady Killers and Our Obsession with Murder: Talking with Tori Telfer

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Tori Telfer discusses her first book Lady Killers and the fragile “social saran wrap” that keeps us all from killing each other.

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This Week in Essays

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For Guernica, Carmen Maria Machado writes about cultural myths around large women and fighting to take up space with her body and her mind. Woe be to those who buy the Peggy couch. Anna Hezel pens a hilarious “buyer beware” at The Awl. Over at Lit Hub, Stéphane Gerson shares the process of writing his grief after losing his son.

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Transportation Sobriety Assistance

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Writing for The Awl, Kristi Coulter gives sound advice on how to avoid airport bars: Once you’ve left the multiplex, you can swing by the Puppy Zone, or curl up in a big armchair, or — for fearful flyers — have a drop-in hypnotherapy session. By then, it should be time to pop onto your plane, stretch out, and […]

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Heather Havrilesky

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We are in a chaotic mess of a world, and our lives are going to be chaotic messes no matter how victorious and shiny we manage to become.

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Censoring Censorship

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Emma Garman discusses the ability of UK’s elite to pay lawyers to keep their names out of the press. She raises the topics of censorship, public interest, and the availability of these resources to people of all classes: The loftiest interpretation of public interest is our common concern with the workings of government, but we’re […]

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No Time Like Now

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At 87 years old, filmmaker and countercultural icon Alejandro Jodorowsky continues to make art at an intimidating pace. He spoke with Anthony Paletta at The Awl about, among other things, his upcoming film Endless Poetry and the three additional films he’s got in the pipeline: I make a series of pictures. There was The Dance of Reality and […]

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Spelling Reformed

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At The Awl, Annie Abrams gives the history of a 19th-century newspaper, Di Anglo-Sacsun, and its editors’ attempts to make literacy more available to the public, by developing their own phonetic alphabet that the newspaper was written in. Abrams also dives into the controversy surrounding the name of the paper: Andrews and Boyle pointedly explained that […]

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Different Voices

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In the hilariously titled “The Fragile Ears of Men,” Leah Finnegan analyzes the gender politics of female singers’ voices, and why male music critics are so irked by Joanna Newsom: But really, what is a musician’s voice if not distinctive? Isn’t that… good? Entire pieces have been written about the voices of Bob Dylan and […]

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I Get My Favorite Short Stories From the CIA

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The Kenyon Review. Mundo Nuevo. The Paris Review. Check out whether you’ve been unknowingly colluding with secret agents whilst reading your favorite lit mags. Patrick Iber writes, “The CIA became a major player in intellectual life during the Cold War—the closest thing that the US government had to a Ministry of Culture.” (The Rumpus would […]

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Our Words, Possessed by Fans

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In the driest language possible, I would say that fan fiction successfully undermines the traditional American heteronormative dynamic in ways that can’t be undone. In wetter language, fan fiction sexualizes. It’s transgressive because it suggests the possibility of the erotic. It’s political, because it complicates power structures. And it’s personal, because it grants permission for […]

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Queen Joan

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The act of anointing Joan Didion as our favorite, our best, our everything, is the act that reveals what we’re trying to say: that we’re cool, that we’re educated, that if we are not young and white and slender and well-dressed and disaffected and sad and committed to the art of writing as an arduous […]

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Rain Dance

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Over at The Awl, Josephine Livingstone treats us to poetics on the colorful sounds of precipitation: Actual rain falling on my urban windows was, however, just too good to miss. I have lived on three continents and my family comes from a fourth: these circumstances have forged in me a deep and abiding attachment to […]

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Light Reading

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Why do readers love to hate the Times’s Style section? While many of its trend pieces are guilty of the same transgressions committed elsewhere in mainstream media, a history of misogyny and homophobia directed at lifestyle journalism suggests our contempt goes beyond objective criticism: Far from detailing the paper’s ignominious decline into muddy ethical waters and […]

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This Week in Short Fiction

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Story|Houston published a beautiful story this week in their Fall 2014 issue, all of which centers around the theme of family, functional or otherwise. “Termites” tells the story of Tamara, aka Tam or Tam-Tam, a youngish woman living in and trying to take care of/sell her family’s childhood home on Staten Island. As you might […]

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Yuppies Read

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Now’s your chance to get your very own piece of David Foster Wallace. Today in New York, Sotheby’s art auction house is offering a small collection of letters the post-post-/meta-modern literary great once sent to his old friend JT Jackson, which Jackson sold to the Ransom Center in 2012. The correspondence includes everything from candid […]

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How to Write (for Actual Legal Tender)

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Over at The Awl, Heather Havrilesky, a writer without an MFA, has some humorous and candid freelancing tips for her MFA students and us readers. Havrilesky knows we’ll appreciate this advice, since she’s “one of the only writers [her] students know who earns actual legal tender from her writing—instead of say, free copies of Ploughshares”: It’s […]

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Your Fantasy Is Hurting You

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When listening to a song, it becomes possible to slip out of reality and into a more idealized state as Chris Wallace writes in “Your Selfie Realization.” The trouble sets in when the fantasy self does not leave. As Wallace describes, it is possible to spend most of one’s time imagining an alternate reality. While […]

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The gift of not responding

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There’s a big secret Twitter doesn’t want you to know, as Choire Sicha writes in a recent article on The Awl. “You don’t have to respond to anyone on Twitter. Ever.” Sicha lists a number of reasons one might choose to not respond on Twitter. Highlights of the list include: “You don’t care,” “You have […]

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