Posts Tagged: the last book i loved

The Last Book I Loved: Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague

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Based on the true story of an English midland town in the year 1666 that quarantined itself to sweat out the bubonic plague, Geraldine Brooks’ Year of Wonders: A Novel of the Plague reminds me of the private school campus where I live with my family in the suburbs of Baltimore, the year 2012. We […]

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Jessica Freeman-Slade: The Last Book I Loved, The Last American Man

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It’s easy to write off one author based on a best-seller. Call it jealousy, call it high-end literary disdain, call it whatever you want, but it’s easy to give in to the impulse to distrust something once it’s become popular. This indeed was my reaction to the author Elizabeth Gilbert, who I (as many others) […]

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Rhona Cleary: The Last Book I Loved, Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch

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Was there ever a place greyer, wetter or lonelier than Paris in the fall? For an Irish person, that’s a weighty question to consider. I guess that in some other incarnation of myself I might have found the glistening cobblestones of Montmartre immeasurably romantic but with my fiancé away on tour and being (scarcely) self-employed, […]

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Traci Dolan: The Last Book I Loved, The Stone Virgins

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One of the first things that became apparent while reading Yvonne Vera’s The Stone Virgins was a gentle spiraling, a contracting of the scope of the novel, from the streets of Bulawayo to the small village of Kezi via the local gathering place Thandabantu; from Thenjiwe and her unnamed lover to her sister Nonceba; contracting […]

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Chris Huntington: The Last Book I Loved, The Brothers Karamazov

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We were in the “international bookstore” of Xiamen, China, which is really a Chinese junk and bookstore but has half a dozen shelves of English books (such as Gossip Girl and 7 Habits of Highly Effective People). My wife found a Signet Classics edition of The Brothers Karamazov. “Do you want that?” she asked. “You do, don’t you? It […]

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The Last Book I Loved: Troubling Love

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According to Europa Edition’s website, Elena Ferrante, one of Italy’s most important and acclaimed contemporary authors, has successfully shunned public attention and kept her whereabouts and her true identity concealed. I understand. Troubling Love is a brilliant rendering of a woman who looks too closely at love and sex.

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Sara Habein: The Last Book I Loved, Midnight Picnic

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How our living selves affect the afterlife has been, and will continue to be, a matter of debate. In literature alone, countless stories have explored the stages of death, of grieving, and that of otherworldly retribution. In Midnight Picnic, Nick Antosca leaves religion out of the discussion and instead explores feelings of abandonment, anger and regret.

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Ari Messer: The Last Book I Loved, Ablutions

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Why is the second person such a natural and addictive tense–perhaps the only honest one–when writing about drug abuse and a foggy recovery? For years, you haven’t been able to stop asking this question. Reading Patrick deWitt’s Ablutions: Notes for a Novel, you are asking it again, vocally (a real dinner-party silencer), by mistake or […]

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The Last (Poetry) Book I Loved: Star Dust by Frank Bidart

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Everything from the theme of creation to the understated technique resonates; it is a book of poetry which has inspired both reflection and furious meditations of my own as I spin my own arcs from Bidart’s example. It is excellent art. Reviews of Star Dust obligatorily quote the following line, and rightly so:

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Aaron Davidson: The Last Book I Loved, Best Music Writing 2007

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I paid $2 for a bargain-bin copy of Best Music Writing 2007. The price tag still covers “s” and “i.” It’s guest edited by Robert Christgau. I’d pay two dollars for anything with contributions by David Byrne, Sasha Frere-Jones, Jonathan Lethem and others because I have high expectations for those writers. That said I have […]

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The Last Book I Loved: Sick City

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In classic noir fashion, Sick City opens with a death. Jeffrey, a male prostitute junkie, goes to wake up his lover and sugar daddy (a retired Los Angeles cop with a taste for kinky sex) only to find him dead. Author Tony O’Neill wastes no time in establishing his distinctive tone: “Jeffrey stared mutely at […]

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