Posts Tagged: The Little Prince

Obviously the Work of Artists

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Director Mark Osborne describes to Vulture how he adapted Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince into an animated film:

“When you’re reading the book, you’re told over and over again in the text, ‘These drawings aren’t very good,’ and you’re actually being tricked into imagining the reality Saint-Exupéry was trying to depict,” says Osborne.

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My Evenings Reading Alone

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For nearly ten years I had lain beside him: the snoring was a blow, but, looking back, it was also a necessary portent, an etch in our story, the fuzzy spot on a picture frame you can’t tell is from the photograph aging or a fingerprint that left its caressing mark on the glass. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: The Ocean at the End of the Lane

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I couldn’t wait to read it, but I was also infinitely patient. It’s that delayed gratification thing. I’m a sucker for it, and there are books that are worth the wait. ...more

The Little [Terrifying] Prince

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The latest installment of The Toast’s delicious “Children’s Stories Made Horrific” series, we are gleeful to report, takes on Le Petit Prince. Featuring quotes like “I drew him my hunger and my thirst. It had long teeth, and a long throat” and “It is such a secret place, the land of tears,” Mallory Ortberg perverts every great aphorism while perfectly mimicking the doe-eyed tone of the original book.

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Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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In “Hunting For The Little Prince,” Sigal Samuel invites us to tag along as she pursues the real-life inspiration for the blonde-haired protagonist of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s famous children’s book. No spoilers, but this particular missing person search ends happily.

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Boa Constrictor in the Derby Hat

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The Little Prince is one of those books which just as easily affects adults as children, and it’s hard to go long without encountering it. Still, the story remains a bit of a mystery. In the New Yorker, Adam Gopnik tries to solve bits of it:

For all of the Prince’s journey is a journey of exile, like Saint-Exupéry’s, away from generic experience towards the eroticism of the particular flower.

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