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Posts Tagged: The Nation

How Toxic Is Online Feminism?

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There’s a heated conversation about online feminism happening—where else?—online right now.

Ignited by a piece in the Nation about Internet toxicity as well as an ill-advised xoJane piece about white privilege in yoga class, the discussion is focusing on intersectionality in feminism, particularly as it regards race.

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Cyber Stalking Really Is That Bad

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Caleb Crain over at The Nation digs in deep to James Lasdun’s new memoir, Give Me Everything You Have, the seemingly terrifying story of his “persecution on the internet by a clever, mentally unbalanced person.”

The cyber-harassment (a wildly tame description of Lasdun’s struggle) was the work of a former student of Lasdun’s, who tormented him over six years with increasingly delusional and threatening emails.

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“What It’s Like to be a Problem”

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At The Nation, Melissa Harris-Perry breaks down the wider political context surrounding the Trayvon Martin killing, outlining the historical and contemporary reality in which it is “acceptable to presume the guilt” of black bodies.

“Liberal democracy—based on commitment to individual liberty and dignity—does not exist if the government legislates against particular bodies in public spaces, as it did during Jim Crow, or when it is complicit in the violent policing of those bodies by other citizens, as in the Trayvon Martin slaying.”

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On Zoe Strauss and Thinking Big

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At The Nation, Barry Schwabsky writes about photographer Zoe Strauss’ “Ten Years” exhibition. Exploring Strauss’ evolving approach to photographic techniques, portraiture and storytelling, Schwabsky argues that her artistic triumphs come from “thinking big”.

“Strauss’s work was a runaway from birth, and by putting her photographs on billboards she is returning them to the streets from which they sprang… But more than that, Strauss’s images are not only about but for the urban rough-and-tumble.

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Fractured Systems

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The Nation explores the poetry of Juliana Spahr, Noah Eli Gordon, Anna Moschovakis and Kathleen Ossip, articulating how all four poets react to “big modern systems,” while rendering compounded emotions.

“In paths through and under and around those systems, economic, environmental and linguistic, these poets address what the critic and poet Christopher Nealon calls the “matter of capital,” the built-up stuff (facts and texts) that our social system manipulates and accumulates, treats as fungible or attempts to discard.”

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On Ann Beattie

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“Beattie is an artist of silence, of the things we don’t say or can’t, the things that find expression anyway. She is an artist of the space between the words—of commas and dashes and periods; of section breaks, blank spaces that her characters seem to hit as if running into a wall.”

The Nation has an in-depth profile of Ann Beattie, which reviews her short stories and her later work, Mrs.

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Women and Elegy

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“In earlier times, when a woman’s response to the death of a beloved may have been limited to suicide, euphemism or enforced silence, these shaped works of art would not have existed.”

Focusing on recent poetry by Susan Howe, Gertrude Schnackenberg, Anne Carson and C.D.

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The Decline Of Hitchens, Again

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A long time ago, back when I was basking in over-priced Leftism in Santa Cruz, I gave a gift to my friend:  Letters To A Yong Contrarian by Christopher Hitchens.

At that time Hitchens was a venom-tongued writer for the progressive magazine The Nation and was still pals with the other equally acid-tongued provocateur, Alexander Cockburn.  (Who believes, among other things, that Al Gore should be tried for war crimes.)

It was before Hitchens’s infamous transformation into a weird neo-con misanthrope radical, back before he all but officially announced his drunken disdain for women, liberals and Muslims.

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