Posts Tagged: The New Inquiry

The Story of A New Name

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Earlier this week, Aaron Brady wrote presciently in his column for The New Inquiry about the ethical implications of revealing Elena Ferrante’s identity. He pointed out that in searching for her “real” identity, reporters were forgetting that one of the greatest things about Elena Ferrante is her fictions, and that at the heart of it, they are still committing the unconscionable act of violating a woman’s privacy:

The Neopolitan novels are literally and directly and magnificently about female self-making, the importance of names, and the meaning of being a woman in public.

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Drawing a Line

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Because borders are so weird, words proliferate. Along with arbitrary, nonsensical violence—and strange, unpredictable exceptions—people talk a lot and lots of papers get filed, even as all of it is, in practice, evacuated of meaning.

For The New Inquiry, Aaron Bady thinks through the poetics and the “Kafka-esque” violence of borders.

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Harvesting Our Desires

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What can the medium of the video game tell us about our collective desires as a society? According to Alfie Brown’s essay for The New Inquiry, a lot actually. The author details how our fascinations with apocalypse gaming and pastoral farming simulations reflect two distinct responses to the hopelessness of capitalism:

Their picture of a lost era of tightly knit villages where humans lived in organic harmony with nature complements prophesies of a dystopic future in which humans are regimented components of a remorseless capitalistic machine.

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Please Sir, I Want Some More

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At The New Inquiry, Christine Baumgarthuber sketches the elitist history of food writing over the centuries before praising digital media’s impact on food culture: 

In a food blog—or any blog, for that matter—the global nature of the Internet pervades and informs the local act of writing.

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VERSO-6--114

The Rumpus Interview with Atossa Araxia Abrahamian

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Atossa Araxia Abrahamian on her new book The Cosmopolites, the citizenship market, nearly getting deported in the Comoros, and learning to show up and wait. ...more

Orphans in Literature

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At The New Inquiry, Alison Kinney examines the use of orphanhood in literature and what attracts readers to this narrative. She goes on to discuss the similarities and differences between orphans represented in literature, like Jane Eyre, and orphans in our real world:

Fairy tales of stolen infants resonate with those of us who come from countries where babies are trafficked, birth families cheated out of their custody, and in-country childless couples wish to adopt but are barred by the higher prices set on the international market.

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A New Tool Based On Old Racialism

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While concerns over the accuracy and invasiveness of the technology are important, the primary fear I have is that the technology available today masks a form of gender and racial stereotyping with the scientific authority of genetics.

Heather Dewey-Hagborg considers the implications of a new law enforcement tool called “Forensic DNA Phenotyping” in an essay over at The New Inquiry.

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Who Digitizes the Books?

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Of course books don’t digitize themselves. Human hands have to individually scan the books, to open the covers and flip the pages. But when Google promotes its project—a database of “millions of books from libraries and publishers worldwide”—they put the technology, the search function and the expansive virtual library in the forefront.

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The Rise of a New Socialist Literary Scene

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Facing financial inequality and burdened with debt, millennials have discovered Marxism, writes Timothy Shenk for the Nation. And millennial writers are leveraging technology, rejecting old guard institutions, and constructing new forums for discussion:

Combine all this with some fondness for navel gazing and with the fortunes of geography—politics aside, New York writers are New York writers, and they like to talk about each other—and the pieces are in place for the articles declaring the rebirth of Marxism that have become a minor genre in the last year.

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Women Who Run with the Wolves (and Pandas and Gorillas and Whales)

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It’s a trend you may never have noticed, but it exists: “women—attractive, single, childless women—have long been coupled with exotic animals. Gentle women and wild animals are linked in myth and fable, fashion photography and pornography, pulp art and fine art.”

A spellbinding essay by Sasha Archibald for the New Inquiry looks at real-life woman–animal pairings and what society has done with their stories, from Ruth Harkness, who introduced pandas to the West, to Dian Fossey “of Gorillas in the Mist fame,” to SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau.

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White Girls and Cultural Appropriation

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White people clamoring to up their cred by appropriating nonwhite culture do so hoping to be rewarded for choices that are falsely seen as inherent in people of color.

In an essay on cultural appropriation for the New Inquiry, Ayesha Siddiqi dissects “the awkward sexism of white supremacy” and what we really mean when we say “white girl.”

It might rearrange your whole way of thinking about certain intersections of race and gender.

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