Posts Tagged: the new york times

A Hinging Thing: Talking with Maggie Smith

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Maggie Smith discusses her new collection Good Bones, how motherhood has changed her writing, and what it felt like to have a poem go viral.

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This Week in Trumplandia

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Welcome to This Week in Trumplandia. Check in with us every Thursday for a weekly roundup of the most pertinent and relevant content on our country, which is currently spiraling down a crappy toilet drain. You owe it to yourself, your communities, and your humanity to contribute whatever you can, even if it is just […]

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Experiencing FoST Fest

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“We are creating a unique story world,” said Charles Melcher, the festival’s founder. “Our tag line is ‘All the world’s a stage, come be a player,’ and this is the ultimate expression of that sentiment.” In an article for the New York Times, Julie Satow writes about the first-ever Future of StoryTelling Festival (aka FoST […]

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“A Return to the Pleasures of Critical Discourse”

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“Greif turns the quotidian world over like a miniature globe in his hand, scrutinizing it for false messages, bad faith, and the occasional sign of progress,” writes Daphne Merkin, in The New York Times, of n+1 co-founder Mark Greif’s essay collection, Against Everything. On subjects as diverse Thoreau, exercise, “foodieism,” and the Octomom, Greif’s eye is […]

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Lovecraft’s Hometown

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To know Lovecraft turns out to be a way to know a great deal about the city [of Providence]. Still weird, and mostly architecturally unchanged since the early 1900s, Providence was H.P. Lovecraft’s stomping ground and muse. Noel Rubinton takes a literary walking tour of the horror/sci-fi master’s haunts for the New York Times, including […]

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Office Space, the Final Frontier

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In A.O. Scott’s eyes, summer blockbusters and workplace sitcoms aren’t that different these days: Part of what makes work tolerable is the idea that it is heroic, the fantasy that repetitive and meaningless tasks are charged with risk and significance. Pecking away at our keyboards, we’re cowboys, warriors, superheroes. But meanwhile, superheroics look like every […]

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Mercury Plummeting

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For the New York Times, Marisa Silver reviews Jenni Fagan’s new novel, The Sunlight Pilgrims, which takes place in a scarily plausible world in which ice caps are melting, sea levels are rising, and the average temperature is well below 0 degrees Fahrenheit. Fagan uses the novel to explore not only the very realistic effects that […]

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All Girls All the Time

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There have been an awful lot of girls in titles lately—The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, Gone Girl, The Girl on the Train, to name a few—writes Alexandra Alter in the New York Times. But popular, formulaic titles aside, some “girl” books worth a deeper look this season include The Girls, by Emma Cline, and Megan […]

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Mapping the Brain

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Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley published a new study about brain activity in people listening to podcasts, the New York Times reported. “Using novel computational methods, the group broke down the stories into units of meaning: social elements, for example, like friends and parties, as well as locations and emotions. They found that […]

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Remaking Jane Austen

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At the New York Times, Alexandra Alter interviews Curtis Sittenfield, author of a modern re-write of Pride and Prejudice, on why she decided to tackle the famous novel, and more: The novel has already proved polarizing among Austen fans. “Sadly disappointing, this book is just trying to cash in on the popularity of Austen’s characters,” one angry […]

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China Bans Foreigners from Publishing Online

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China has issued a ban on foreign-owned media from publishing online within the nation. Global news agencies like Reuters, Dow Jones, the New York Times, and Bloomberg have invested considerable sums in building bureaus in the country. The foreign media ban is another step in reversing the nation’s loosening of censorship laws. This, along with the disappearance […]

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Conversations with Writers Braver than Me: Anne Roiphe

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Anne Roiphe on respecting writers’ freedom to express the truth of their experiences, while also respecting their subjects’ prerogative to shun them for it.

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The Big Idea: Mark Bittman

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Suzanne Koven talks to food journalist, author, and activist Mark Bittman about his “Big Idea”—how food has changed in the last fifty years, and how to teach our children to eat better.

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Time Travel in the Antarctic

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In the latest installment of the New York Times‘s Sunday Book Review, Caroline Alexander writes an elegant review of Rebecca Hunt’s Everland, a novel about two expeditions in the Antarctic that take place more than a century apart: Her careful control of the narratives and dramatic pacing keeps the tension in each story steadily escalating. […]

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: On Madness and Mad Men

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In my eight years as a Mad Men fan, the series has repeatedly prompted me to reflect on parenting.

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The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Gira Grant

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Melissa Gira Grant talks sex workers’ rights, labor politics, the novelty of women’s sexuality, and her book, Playing the Whore: The Work of Sex Work.

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Sacred Literature

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For the New York Times, Alexandra Alter interviews Salman Rushdie about his new novel Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights. Their discussion covers the stylistic choices that went into the novel, as well as the role of mythology and polytheistic religions in Rushdie’s larger body of work: Ideas are interesting to me, and religions are a […]

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