Posts Tagged: The Toast

The Catch-22 of Representation

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Heroine Complex author Sarah Kuhn writes on her impulse as a child to dislike Jubilee, the Marvel superhero she was “supposed” to identify with as an Asian-American woman, and the pressures of creating representative characters for women of color in a marketplace with so few:

Instead of worrying that the entertainment I consumed elevated bad representation, I worried that the entertainment I created did the same.

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Growing Up with ADHD

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Despite the narrative that we are over-diagnosing ADHD in children, symptoms of ADHD often go unrecognized in girls. At the Toast, Grace Lidinsky-Smith discusses navigating grade school with undiagnosed ADHD, her experiences with feelings of shame, and the impact of finally receiving treatment:

I wanted to write this for my younger self, and for all girls who keep silent and try to be obedient despite the ruckus in their skulls.

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(Attractive) Debut Novelists Earn Millions

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Emma Cline received $2m advance for The Girls, due out in June, which puts her near the top of a growing list of first-time writers with advances in the millions. Last year, City on Fire earned Garth Risk Hallberg a $2m advance.

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More Money, (Not) More Problems

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In a powerful and anecdotal essay at The Toast, Nicole Chung discusses how money-related anxiety has stayed with her into adulthood, and how disparity between her and her husband’s attitudes toward money influences the dynamic of their marriage:

It makes it sound as though my money-related anxiety is nothing more than an unfortunate personality quirk, when in fact there’s an excellent reason why my husband generally believes things will work out, while I tend to imagine we are just one crisis away from financial ruin: he comes from a family for whom things do work out, and I do not.

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Tech Companies Profit While Writers Starve

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Digital media companies are suddenly worried about declining ad revenue, and the venture capitalists funding these companies have also turned off the faucet of cash as they realize that success stories like BuzzFeed and Mashable are not the unicorns everyone thought they were.

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Why Are You On Your Knees? That Looks Boring

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In an essay for The Toast, Anne Marquette reveals the parallels between living as asexual and living as an atheist. In both cases, society surrounds you with guidelines to peak experiences—salvation, true love—that don’t apply to you. The only sensible thing to do is make up your own rules:

There will always be a tension between what I think I should feel and what I don’t, but love is more than a feeling.

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The Worthwhile Relationship in Collaborative Writing

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Writing is most often thought of as a solitary activity, and writers know the hazards of too many captains steering the ship of a single piece. At The Toast, Jilly Gagnon considers the ups and downs of working with a writing partner and concludes that, despite many frustrating aspects, the experience is ultimately rewarding:

Writing with someone else is like nuking the ground you previously napalmed.

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Building Your Dream Library

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For the daytime version of your library you need some natural light. How will your library illustrate the romance of pursuing knowledge if you can’t see dust particles floating in sunbeams? How are you going to achieve enlightenment without light?

Book-lovers know all too well the struggle to find places to store all their books; who amongst us hasn’t dreamed of having a personal library to house them all?

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Our Literary Footpaths

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Over at The Toast, Rebecca Turkewitz writes about the intersections between literary geography and the real, from Joyce’s Dublin and Tolkien’s Middle Europe to Faulkner’s Mississippi and Munro’s Ontario—how we explore these places by walking through pages, and how they map to our homes and street corners.

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The Gift of Gratefulness

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The worst insult people hurl at adoptees is that they are “ungrateful” and should “go back” (to their “own” countries, to their old families). That is the moment when adoption becomes a gift—because that is the moment when it becomes clear that adoption belongs to people like the adoptive parent and not people like the adoptee.

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Language, Love, and Loss

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Over at The Toast, Nicole Chung has written a deeply personal and beautiful essay about coming to terms with her adoption, embracing her Korean heritage, and learning her mother tongue alongside her daughter:

When I watch my daughter writing in Korean, when we talk about our family history, when she seems sure about who she is … and her place in our family and in the world, I cannot help but feel there are many different kinds of victories to be found, and many ways to heal.

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Grantland: A Rumpus Roundup

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At the end of October, ESPN announced that Grantland, the sports and culture website it had acquired, would cease publication.

Some commentators claimed the site should have been shuttered sooner when Bill Simmons, the “voice” of Grantland, parted ways with ESPN.

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Collaborative Creativity in Coloring Books

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With the rise of adult coloring books on bestseller lists comes an interesting intersection between the artists who create the books and the consumers who color them. Over at The Toast, Katherine Cusumano makes the case for the coloring book as a unique collaborative medium, a means to allow the everyman to engage with art actively:

The coloring book assumes that visual art is open-ended and incomplete.

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