Posts Tagged: The Washington Post

President of Smut

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Our country has always been ruled by and for the privileged, but never has this glaring injustice in the system been made so shamelessly clear.

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The Read Along: Neda Semnani

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I picked up The Odyssey because I wanted to read about wanders and refugees. A story about a man who takes a decade to get home and is on a quest for safety seemed like a good place to start.

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Readers Report: The Emperor’s New Clothes

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A collection of short pieces written by Rumpus readers pertaining to the subject of “The Emperor’s New Clothes.”

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Trump + Books = ???

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At Electric Literature, Dani Spencer looks at Japanese writers who have already written dozens of books that envision what the world could look like if Donald Trump were to win the election. Let’s hope that’s the closest we have to get to finding out. Meanwhile, on a lighter note, Twitter imagines how the known non-reader […]

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“Our Parents Wouldn’t Let Us”: The Death of Liberal Arts

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The liberal arts are shrinking fast on college campuses, and for one simple reason: parents don’t want their kids to have liberal arts degrees. For the Washington Post, Steven Pearlstein, Professor of Public Affairs at George Mason University, writes about witnessing this phenomenon firsthand in his own classroom. Parents are more interested in the graduation-to-employment pathway, […]

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A Fictional Tyrant Come to Life

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At the Washington Post, Carlos Lozada compares Donald Trump with the fictional dictators of two novels that seem to uncannily anticipate the rise of today’s foul-mouthed “politician.” Sinclair Lewis’s It Can’t Happen Here (1935) and Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America (2004) both feature totalitarian politicians that will eerily remind readers of Trump’s policies and personality. […]

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Invention of Place

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Aram Goudsouzian reviews Mitchell Duneier’s new book, Ghetto: The Invention of a Place, the History of an Idea. In the book, Duneier explores how the term “ghetto” has evolved throughout history, and what we understand the American ghetto to be today: Engaging a host of classic works of urban sociology, Duneier describes how social scientists […]

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The Rumpus Interview with Melissa Gira Grant

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Melissa Gira Grant talks sex workers’ rights, labor politics, the novelty of women’s sexuality, and her book, Playing the Whore: The Work of Sex Work.

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Lollapalooza Nostalgia

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In celebration of this era recently stirred up by the release of Montage of Heck, the Washington Post published an oral history of Lollapalooza’s most alternative of tours. In 1995, Lollapalooza’s founders took a break from booking platinum artists and experimented with featuring a lineup that matched the “indie” and “alternative” labels that are now so […]

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Choice Encourages Reading

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Students who read four to six books in a summer are more likely to maintain their reading skills between semesters. As a result, many schools develop summer reading programs to help stave off the inevitable intellectual decline students face during the summer months. However, assigning books to students might be less effective than allowing them to choose. […]

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James Patterson, Philanthropist

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Bestselling author James Patterson is giving school libraries $1.25 million in grants of $1,000 to $10,000 for books, reading programs, and technology, reports the Washington Post. Patterson has previously pledged $1 million to 175 independent bookstores. His generosity is all part of a broader goal to encourage more reading nationally.

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