Posts Tagged: the writing life

Slush Piles in White

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The sensibilities of whiteness do not want us to work, do not want us to think, do not want us to imagine outside of its bounds.

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Ambiguity as a Daily Experience: Talking with Jess Arndt

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Jess Arndt discusses her debut story collection Large Animals, accepting love from other people, human bodies, and fear of the written word.

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The Real Lives of Working Writers

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Bestselling and award-winning writers Danielle Trussoni and Walter Kirn host the Writerly podcast, a weekly discussion of all things pertaining to the real lives of working writers. From getting and firing an agent, to book publicity, to contracts, to working with an editor, to writing your first draft—Writerly will cover it all. And, follow Danielle […]

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The Storming Bohemian Punks the Muse #6: What’s Love Got to Do with It?

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My sister wrote and published a memoir about our childhood. It’s a good book, and I’m proud of her. It has won awards, and put her in demand on a national speaking circuit. Am I jealous of my little sister? Yep. She’s an engineer by training; I was the artist in the family. By rights, […]

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Mexico City’s Budding Writing Scene

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Writing in Mexico City is like holding a conversation when you’re under the takeoff and landing path of the city’s airplanes: you have to shut up sometimes, to let the noise take over everything, to let the sky split in two before picking up where you left off. As Americans, we tend to forget there […]

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Admit It! You’re A Writer

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For The Millions, Marcia DeSanctis shares how she learned to become a “second-career writer” after resisting her literary ambitions while working as a television news producer: A stifled artist was scratching through all of my work identities, and though my jobs were fascinating I never really had the mettle to soldier on. I turned down more […]

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False Dichotomy

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Can women really have it all? Like, all of it? But how could they possibly have multiple things at the same time? How can they even think human thoughts after they’ve subsumed their corporeal selves into an all-encompassing prison of motherhood? For Lit Hub, miraculous hybrid mother/writer Diana Abu-Jaber explains that art and babies aren’t […]

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The Literary Hustle

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Even after authors finish writing their book, they have plenty of work to do to promote it. With so many books and limited space in media outlets, the literary hustle is a major part of any book launch. Over at Publishers Weekly, Camille Perri looks at the challenges and subjectivity of book coverage: I also […]

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The Writing Life in Nigeria

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A new essay by Nigerian author A. Igoni Barrett (Love Is Power, or Something Like That and Blackass) highlights the ways poverty and struggle work against those in Nigeria who would be writers: I found nothing there for me [at his university in Ibadan]. No friends with similar tastes in books. No literary journals by […]

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Getting There

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Success in the literary world often demands money in the real world. For Lit Hub, Lorraine Berry calls out the system that excludes working class voices from the conversation: How much more dedication did one need to prove beyond that? But that’s not exactly something you can put on a resume.

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Vonnegut’s Secret Weapon

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Without his wife Jane’s faith and encouragement in his writing, it’s highly likely we wouldn’t know Kurt Vonnegut’s name from Adam. The New Yorker explores Jane’s influence on her husband throughout his career as an author. Kurt was more pragmatic, casting about for career ideas—teaching, reporting, opening a library with a bar. Jane had just […]

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Guildtalk #3: Lori Ostlund

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For our ongoing Authors Guild series, Lori Ostlund speaks with Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Richard Russo about what it means to live a literary life in the 21st century.

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Less Room

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New York is the worst. What are all these writers still doing here? My years spent in New York (where I had also grown up), had made it clear to me there was less and less room for failure in that city, and therefore less room for creative freedom. Fatin Abbas picks up and moves […]

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