Posts Tagged: This Week in Essays

This Week in Essays

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Alexandra Wuest tackles grief, art, and the insights solitude can offer over at Fanzine.

For Real Life, Eleanor Penny asks the big questions about and considers the implications of the creation of an artificial womb.

Here at The Rumpus, Zoe Fisher recalls finding a radical sanctuary in her local library as a teenager.

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This Week in Essays

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In a stunning bit of reportage at Guernica, Lacy M. Johnson looks at the costs of laying nuclear waste to rest, and at the impact doing so has had on one particular St. Louis suburb.

For Nowhere, Hillary Kaylor finds there’s little she can do to help the kids who spend their days scavenging a dump in Cambodia.

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This Week in Essays

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“There may be freedom in America but it is not for me.” At Catapult, Kenechi Uzor reminds us that not every immigrant story is an uncomplicated, happy one.

Mallika Rao writes for the Atlantic on the the beloved web series Brown Girls, its coming leap to HBO, and the promise of more complex narratives for people of color.

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This Week in Essays

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At Nowhere, Alia Volz takes a long-shot journey to Cuba to tie up loose ends.

For Guernica, Katherina Grace Thomas writes about that time Nina Simone loved and left paradise.

Here at The Rumpus, Alaina Leary considers the painful work of accounting for family possessions under dire circumstances.

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This Week in Essays

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For The Smart Set, Natasha Burge walks the streets of Khobar, Saudi Arabia, and examines the ways both cities and selves can change through time.

In this latest Multitudes installment for The Rumpus, Christine No writes a stunning piece on family and attempts at healing.

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This Week in Essays

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Take an immersive trip down the Maine coast with Porter Fox at Nowhere magazine.

For The Rumpus, Nancy Jooyoun Kim examines the bizarre dynamics and privilege within the world of tourism.

At The Offing, Gabrielle Montesanti’s reflections on piss are pretty great.

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This Week in Essays

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When Sandra A. Miller’s sister gets cancer, the family looks to their similar sense of humor as a way to power through in an essay on Literal Latte.

Here at The Rumpus, Leslie Jill Patterson looks at the unprecedented action on death row in Arkansas and the ways we try to reassure ourselves in matters of state-sanctioned murder.

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This Week in Essays

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For The New Inquiry, Nehal El-Hadi questions whether we will ever see technology that opens up the preservation of black life rather than simply documenting black death.

Mina Hamedi chases the Northern Lights over at Arcturus.

Here at the Rumpus, Celeste Mohammed explores her conflicted feelings toward a white artist painting black Caribbean farmers.

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This Week in Essays

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For Huffington Post’s Highline magazine, Jason Fagone profiles a trauma surgeon working to make a small dent in our country’s problem with gun violence.

At Catapult, Abbey Fenbert writes a funny, heartfelt essay about trying to ban books in the seventh grade.

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This Week in Essays

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At Granta, Deepti Kapoor’s observations on traveling the world draw her closer to home.

At The Rumpus, Kaylie Jones writes on the ripple effect mental illness has on a family grappling with a loved one’s struggles.

Danielle Jackson traces her literary heritage and the guideposts who helped her along the way for Lit Hub.

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This Week in Essays

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For Lidia Yuknavitch, the personal is unavoidably political in this piece for Electric Literature.

At Catapult, David Frey writes with moving realness on what it is like to watch a parent age and transition into assisted living.

Jenessa Abrams looks at the nuances of mental illness and the damage of a word like “crazy” here at The Rumpus.

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This Week in Essays

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For the Guardian, Dina Nayeri explores the troubling expectation that immigrants should replace their identity with gratitude.

At New York magazine, Bahar Gholipour covers the fine points of dredging up personal history when writing memoir.

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