Posts Tagged: Thomas Pynchon

Anderson Doesn’t “Cut and Paste”

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In an interview for NPR, director Paul Thomas Anderson shares his experience adapting Thomas Pynchon’s Inherent Vice for the big screen:

I approached it in the most straightforward but laborious way I could come up with. I transcribed the dialogue… And there were multiple times when I thought, “Why don’t I just call the publisher and get a PDF and cut and paste this on the computer?” But there was something about typing it out again that made me — it made me get to know the book, you know, really deeply.

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The Thomas Pynchon Myth

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Thomas Pynchon is a reclusive author—or so we are told. Vice unearths the origins of Pynchon’s famous isolation, attributing the legend to the Paris Review‘s George Plimpton:

It all started 51 years ago, in 1963, when George Plimpton in the New York Times published the line: “Pynchon is in his early twenties; he writes in Mexico City—a recluse.” It is doubtful if Plimpton, who helped create the Paris Review, knew at the time that he was accidentally kicking off the largest and longest game of Where’s Waldo?

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Pynchon’s Paranoiac Vision

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In 1966, when The Crying of Lot 49 was published, Pynchon’s “all-ecompassing paranoiac vision of history” seemed “so kooky” and “far-fetched.”

Fast forward to 2013, and Pynchon’s Bleeding Edge, a novel focused on events before, during, and after 9/11 “becomes not just an ideal but a compulsory subject for a late Pynchon novel,” as Michael Chabon writes in his review for The New York Review of Books.

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Less Face, More Book for These Reclusive Authors

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Though it can be hard to remember between tweeting at your favorite writer and joining a Facebook event page for a reading, there was a time when many authors led reclusive lives with minimal self-promotion.

Bookish has rounded up a list of some of the most private (Salinger, Pynchon)—and their modern-day, super-public opposites (John Green, Susan Orlean).

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The Brewing Of Lot 49

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How did Los Angeles, that haven of low-culture and strip mall malaise beat us (San Francisco) to the punch with high-brow coffee? (I jest. L.A. is great if you want to buy human bone jewelry, guzzle incredible garlic sauce, and hang out with famous porn stars in a 24 hour Jewish deli.)

How did not one of the six new cafes that opened  last week on Valencia Street contain even a passing reference to Thomas Pynchon and his mythical post-bugle as featured in The Crying Of Lot 49?

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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This week, the book blogs are obsessed.

They really, really want to tell you everything about William Vollman and Thomas Pynchon and their new wondrous masterpieces of weird. I love both authors and look forward to reading both books, but this week, the blogs talked so incessantly about them that I will make this roundup a Vollman and Pynchon free zone, with one exception.

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The Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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Greetings and salutations! I’m Michael Berger, today’s guest-editor.  I’ve spent my last few days off sipping coffee and drifting through the labyrinth of book blogs. Which was terrific, because most of my work week was spent moving a bookstore. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, the 25 year old San Francisco used bookstore Phoenix Books is not only not going out of business but they are now in a place that is twice as big and beautiful.

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