Posts Tagged: TV

Learning to Live Alone through the Legacy of Mary Tyler Moore

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Characters like Mary and Rhoda hadn't been turned into stereotypes of single women in their thirties or career women or divorcees. They couldn't be: they were the first. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: 69 Love Songs

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Everywhere people are shoving things into the ground—time capsules not to be opened until the year 2100, the more optimistic postmarked for 3000—letters to the future in the language of the now. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Taking Comfort in Futurama

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I’m a comfort watcher... I retreat into the worlds I know well, with characters that are friends, with outcomes I already understand. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: All Bodies Count

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Personal representation weighs heavily on the disabled because we don't often see each other out in the world. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Dead Girls Sold Here

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Why then are we comfortable with women routinely being cast as the victims of violence? Why don’t we see that as sexist? Where is the outrage? ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Transparent and the Evolving Culture of Shame

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There's a ray of nuclear longing at the center of Transparent... ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Frederick Barthelme

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Frederick Barthelme talks about his new novel, There Must Be Some Mistake, life after teaching, and why food from the Olive Garden is “execrable in the best possible way.” ...more

YA Television

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This summer’s debate over young adult literature has raised questions ranging from whether adults should read YA to what even counts as thee genre in the first place. The New Yorker’s television critic Emily Nussbaum extends these questions to the world of television, where adolescent dramas have had a different impact on the development and survival of the medium:

This debate has focused on books.

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TV Can Be Literature Too

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Long-running, writer-driven shows have overtaken American cinema as the most prestigious strand of American visual culture, revealing most of even the supposedly best American movies as risk-averse, unimaginative, and hopelessly bound by their time constraints.

Todd Hasak-Lowy argues on the Believer‘s blog that despite TV’s bad rep among literary types, there is Good TV that reaches the level of Literature (caps his).

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