Posts Tagged: Virginia Quarterly Review

Literature vs. NYC

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Independent publishers are producing literature, Chris Fischbach writes in the Virginia Quarterly Review, which is not the same thing as what commercial publishers are printing. Fischbach (a publisher at Coffee House Press) goes on to explain a duality similar to that of Chad Harbach’s MFA vs NYC—if there are two competing writing identities, one is premised on earning money while the other focuses on artistic expression:

Literature is not the same thing as publishing.

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The State of American Poetry

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If you liked David Biepsiel’s State of American Poetry address, here’s a nice counterpart by Natasha Trethewey at the Virginia Quarterly Review.

“Despair about the place of poetry in American culture is nothing new,” she begins, and goes on to write about the necessity and indelibility of poetry at the most basic levels:

For all of that, poetry is the corrective, the sacred language that allows us to connect across time and space, across all the things in everyday life that separate us and would destroy us.

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Namibian Fashion Spools Out a Whole World of Meaning

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To many Americans, fashion is a frivolous distraction. To many women in Namibia, it’s an expression of identity hammered out of years of tradition, culture, colonialism, and genocide.

Catherine E. McKinley writes about it in fascinating detail for the Virginia Quarterly Review, with incredible photos by Thabiso Sekgala to match.

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“Revolutionary, Disruptive Technology”: The Business of Books

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What is particularly crucial to understand is that books were not dragged kicking and screaming into each new area of capitalism. Books not only are part and parcel of consumer capitalism, they virtually began it.

In an essay for the Virginia Quarterly Review, former head of Soft Skull Press Richard Nash explores the business of literature with an almost alarming degree of thoroughness.

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Why Celebrity Gossip Is Actually Kind of Important

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Here’s something to look forward to: Anne Helen Petersen’s “Scandals of Classic Hollywood” column, which we blogged about previously, is becoming a book!

If you simply can’t wait for the publishing-industry process to put that book in your hands, you can sate your appetite with Petersen’s longform piece “The Rules of the Game,” which appears in the latest issue of Virginia Quarterly Review.

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What Happens When Literary Journals Report The News?

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With newspapers folding and cutting corners all around the country, it’s easy to give up entirely on the fourth estate. But now look who’s riding in on their white horse: those writers you newspaper types wouldn’t give jobs to before because they tried to make their articles all “literary.” Take that, 5 W’s.

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VQR Interviews Michelle Orange

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The Rumpus’s own Michelle Orange has a contribution in the Virginia Quarterly Review‘s most recent issue.

The piece, entitled “Beirut Rising,” “entertains with its amusing depiction of the Lebanese passion for plastic surgery, but the essay also penetrates deep into to the sadness at the city’s core.”

In order to highlight the piece, VQR‘s Anna Sheaffer asked Michelle 6 questions to “get her thoughts on Beirut’s political future, travel writing, and reporting in territory where journalists are suspect.”

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