Posts Tagged: virginia woolf

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The Rumpus Interview with Lynn Steger Strong

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Lynn Steger Strong discusses her debut novel Hold Still, the influence of Virginia Woolf, unconditional love, and exit strategies. ...more

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The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Louise Erdrich

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The esteemed author talks about the themes of justice, atonement, and reparation in her fifteenth novel, LaRose, and about the importance of Planned Parenthood to her success. ...more

The “Transmutation” of Objects

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For Open Culture, Ayun Halliday investigates Patti Smith’s relationship to objects and literature, highlighting how the songwriter, artist, and author looks to objects in order to feel “closer” to her favorite writers:

She and husband Smith celebrated their first anniversary by collecting stones from the French Guiana penal colony, Saint-Laurent-du-Maroni, in an effort to feel closer to Jean Genet, one of her most revered authors.

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The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Mark Leyner

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Mark Leyner on his new book Gone with the Mind, pressuring the novel form, being a purist Dionysian, and artisanal pap smears. ...more

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: How To Make Sure Your Writing Is Forgotten

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Do you really want to have to listen from the grave as students discuss your themes and scholars analyze your syntax and trace your influence? ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Karen Salyer McElmurray

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Karen Salyer McElmurray talks about academia, the relationship between flaws and perfection, writing memoir, and the "tapestry" of writers who inspire her. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Garth Greenwell

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Garth Greenwell discusses his debut novel, What Belongs to You, crossing boundaries, language as defense, and the queer tradition of novel writing that blurs boundaries between fiction and essay and autobiography. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Danielle Dutton

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Danielle Dutton discusses her forthcoming novel Margaret the First, the research behind writing historical fiction, and how being the editor of a small press has influenced her own work. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Sandra and Ben Doller

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Sandra and Ben Doller talk about The Yesterday Project, a blind collaboration, and about what it means to savor each day when you have stage III melanoma. ...more

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The Rumpus Interview with Lauren Groff

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Lauren Groff talks about her new novel, Fates and Furies, the life of creative people and those who love them, and why she's grateful to anyone who reads books. ...more

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Karrie Higgins

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The more narratives that approach reality "differently" get treated as "insane" or "unreal," the less readers are exposed to them, and the more "unreal" or "insane" they seem. It's like a feedback loop. ...more

One Way for Women To Be

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What I should have said to that crowd was that our interrogation of Woolf’s reproductive status was a soporific and pointless detour from the magnificent questions her work poses. (I think at some point I said, “Fuck this shit,” which carried the same general message and moved everyone on from the discussion.) After all, many people have children; only one made To the Lighthouse and The Waves, and we were discussing Woolf because of the books, not the babies.

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Steve Stern

The Rumpus Book Club Chat with Steve Stern

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The Rumpus Book Club chats with Steve Stern about his new novel The Pinch, about what it means for Jews to be "people of the book," and how fiction and history can be entwined in entertaining and challenging ways. ...more

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My Evenings Reading Alone

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For nearly ten years I had lain beside him: the snoring was a blow, but, looking back, it was also a necessary portent, an etch in our story, the fuzzy spot on a picture frame you can’t tell is from the photograph aging or a fingerprint that left its caressing mark on the glass. ...more

Weekend Rumpus Roundup

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For National Poetry Month Days 25 & 26, Christian Anton Gerard and Ada Limon provide us with poems of love and luck.

Then, Sean Donovan has good things to say in his Saturday Review of the film It Follows, a “clever” tribute to John Carpenter and the horror cinema of the 80s.

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Creativity and Mental Illness

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Though I did not know it then, Adeline was not just a work of fiction, or an act of literary ventriloquism. It was my suicide note. Had I succeeded in taking my life, this would have been clear.

At Lit Hub, Norah Vincent writes about the intensity of creating her Virginia Woolf novel Adeline, the link between creativity and mental illness, and how this led her to attempt taking her own life.

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Weird, Wonderful Woolf

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Emma Woolf (yes, a relation) writes about the personal life of Virginia Woolf:

There has been much speculation about the sexual dimension of the Woolfs’ relationship: was the marriage ever consummated, was she frigid, was she a lesbian? In 1967 her half-brother Gerald Brenan added fuel to the fire, writing: “Leonard told me that when on their honeymoon he had tried to make love to her, she had got into such a violent state of excitement that he had to stop, knowing as he did that, these states were a prelude to her attacks of madness .

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“And She Went on Her Way Rejoicing”

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Muriel Spark and the perennial question: “Am I a woman or an intellectual monster?” ...more

Back to the Future

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The past is always a story, impossible to remember without molding it into a narrative that privileges some details over others and colors memory with tone. Reflecting on a recent trend toward biographical fiction, Joanna Scutts warns us about the dangers of time travel:

When imagination pours into the gaps in the biographical record, overcoming the frustrations of burned letters and lost diaries by making things up, it replaces history with a plausible lie, which tells us far more about our own time than it does about the past.

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