Posts Tagged: virginia woolf

Privilege vs. Privilege

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In an excerpt from her book The Shelf, Phyllis Rose illustrates the systematic dismissal of women writers through the imagined figure of Prospero’s Daughter: wealthy and educated yet burdened by the demands of a family life whose quotidian challenges, having monopolized her time, become central concerns in her work.

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Plunge Into the Dark with Open Eyes

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Terrifying though the unknown may seem, there are benefits to plunging into the murky waters of uncertainty. In an essay featured in the New YorkerRebecca Solnit writes, “It’s the job of writers and explorers to see more, to travel light when it comes to preconception, to go into the dark with their eyes open.”

There is so much we don’t know, and to write truthfully about a life…is to engage repeatedly with those patches of darkness…those places of unknowing.

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Hear Virginia Woolf’s Voice

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Over at Brain Pickings, Maria Popova highlights the only known recording of Virginia Woolf’s voice.

In the recording, Woolf reads from an essay on craft (which Popova conveniently reprints in the post): “How can we combine the old words in new orders so that they survive, so that they create beauty, so that they tell the truth?”

We hope it doesn’t sound disrespectful to point out that her voice sounds a lot like the Maggie Smith as the Dowager Countess on Downton Abbey, and it’s delightfully mesmerizing.

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T.S. Eliot’s Long-Lost Lecture

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In a letter of May 21, 1924, an English literary critic invited T.S. Eliot to speak to the club on “any subject connected with the Elizabethan drama.”

As late as November 6, Eliot told Richard Aldington that the lecture was “still in very rough shape.” Shortly afterward he wrote to Virginia Woolf that, despite all of his labors, it proved “unworthy of subsequent publication.”

Despite T.S.

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“This Other Reality Exists”

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Our girl Elissa Bassist lays some hella smart analysis on Orange is the New Black for Medium:

To see what’s been missing in popular culture is to see how comprehensive and refined the brainwashing has become….the number/diversity of women on-screen, the depth/complexity of their stories, the scope/span of their humanity—is one antidote to objectification.

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“It’s a long time since I drank champagne.”

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These are Anton Chekhov’s last words, and the Guardian has a slideshow of some sometimes funny, sometimes chilling last words of quite a few literary figures.

(And while we’re talking about slideshows, I’d actually recommend the Jacket Copy write-up instead of the Guardian’s, because slideshows drive me freakin’ bonkers.

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Rebecca Steinitz: The Last Book I Loved, Cheerful Weather for the Wedding

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9781906462079The last book I loved was Cheerful Weather for the Wedding by Julia Strachey. I hadn’t loved a book in a while, but I thought I might love this one because it is a Persephone book, and I also quite loved the cover which features a 1930s Harold Knight painting of a languid young lady in a sea-colored sweater and yellow skirt, reading on a window seat, with downs or cottages or some such British landscape murkily visible through the window beside her.

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2009 Woolf and the City Preview

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picture-3On the heels of BEA comes the 2009 Woolf and the City conference, an event of modern proportion, which will be bringing fans of Virginia Woolf to the campus of Fordham University in New York from June 4-7. Keeping things ahead of the times, as Woolf would have wanted it, there will be Plenary Talks such as “Woolf’s Creative Violence,” “Cosmopolitan Woolf,” and “Stalking the Cyber-Woolf in a Digital Age.”  Special events include an evening with Princeton and the Stephen Pelton Dance Company, with an after party at the Hudson Hotel.

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