Posts Tagged: Vulture

Shocking the American Short Story

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Three more anthologies published last year suggest that while the [short] story remains one of our most flexible popular literary forms, and the quickest to absorb signals from the culture, if we’re on the verge of another revolution, the shockwaves haven’t registered yet. Or perhaps the short story in America has matured to a point […]

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The One-Man Publishing House

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Gabriel Levinson just might operate one of the world’s smallest independent publishers. ANTIBOOKCLUB releases just one book a year and each title is the product of the one-man publisher who serves as editor, marketer, promoter, and bookkeeper. Brooklyn-based Levinson has sold off his precious record collection and his personal library to fund the press’s titles.

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Every Editors Nightmare

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“The publisher functions more like an executive producer on a movie,” says the nonfiction author Susan Orlean. A New Yorker writer steeped in its culture of obsessive fact-checking, Orlean has had the converse publishing experience to Shane’s. “I remember being absolutely flabbergasted when I turned in my first book and they said, ‘Terrific, we’ve already […]

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The Era of the Very Long Novel

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At Vulture, Boris Kachka looks into the recent trend of publishing “mega-books,” with the hopes of answering a seemingly straightforward question: “When did book get so freaking enormous?” In his analysis, Kachka touches upon works by Knausgaard, Tartt, and Catton, all authors of recent works of significant length that have received a great deal of literary acclaim.

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Not So Literal

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These days there are so many screens showing superheroes one can almost forget that they came from comics. Ta-Nehisi Coates talks to Vulture about storytelling, representation, and the places where movies fall short: We’re talking about something that’s so surreal it’s just not possible within the world as we know it. So that requires a […]

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Bellow’s Back

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Simultaneously divisive and overlooked, Saul Bellow’s work has produced both fervent supporters and detractors while alienating many younger readers. This spring, a new biography by Zachary Leader will bring the late author back into the conversation. Vulture‘s Lee Siegel reflects on the strengths and shortcomings of a writer whose political incorrectness was matched only by […]

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Questioning Harper Lee’s Editor Answers

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Here’s an author who has staunchly refused interviews and publicity since 1960, who hasn’t breathed a word about her interest in publishing another book to either family or friends, but who is suddenly fine with releasing her decades-old Mockingbird prequel, despite the fact that it doesn’t sound like anyone at her publisher has actually been […]

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Tip of the Hat to Colbert

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Among the many tributes to the nine-year run of The Colbert Report, which aired its final episode last week, comes Vulture’s tip of the hat on behalf of “book nerds.” The Colbert Report interviewed two authors a week, on average, introducing their work to what was arguably the publishing industry’s best audience; Boris Kachka reports […]

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Down There

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In light of Plush, Marilyn Minter’s new book of pubic hair photography, Vulture looks back on the history of the female bush in Western art. Like the women who owned them, pubes through the ages were nearly invisible: Of course other artists had painted female pubic mounds aplenty, but these works were strictly pornographic. Indeed, […]

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On Oryx and Crake

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Margaret Atwood’s Oryx and Crake has been adapted for HBO, and the good folks at Vulture have asked her about it. She riffs on language, Comic-Con, and The Hunger Games’ “stimulated environment”: I think the real issues there are moral: Would I kill my best friend? It’s funny how when girls are given weapons, it’s […]

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Peak Dystopia

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Adam Sternbergh, author of Dystopian novel Shovel Ready, asked whether readers are burning out on the Dystopian novel. He goes as far as suggesting that perhaps the next great novel will be a Utopian one. Emily Temple, writing at Flavorwire, explains why Utopias don’t make good novel settings: The reason that utopian novels are far […]

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Magical Influences

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Lev Grossman has given the Harry Potter series an inspirational nod more than once, and he does it again over at Vulture. But he’s just as fond of The Bourne Identity, Marcel Proust, and the music of Metric: I don’t always listen to music when I’m writing, but when I do listen to music, I listen to […]

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Ballad of a WiFi Hero

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Yesterday, Vulture premiered “In Which I Fix My Girlfriend’s Grandparents’ WiFi and Am Hailed As a Conquering Hero,” an animated short based on Mike Lacher’s popular McSweeney’s humor piece of the same name and which “follows the harrowing tale of a bold warrior who confronts unbelievable obstacles (a faulty router, clutter behind some furniture, a power outlet) to […]

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The Pleasure of Perfectly Positioned Punctuation

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As conscientious writers know, punctuation can make all the difference in a sentence, sculpting mush into meaning or cluing the reader in to nuances of intonation. Vulture’s Kathryn Schulz has compiled some of literature’s most effective and memorable instances of punctuation, from Nabokov’s parenthetical “(picnic, lightning)” to the ellipses in T. S. Eliot’s “The Love […]

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The Copycat Lolita

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A few weeks before Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita came out, the New Yorker published a short story about a man consorting with a young woman named Lolita instead of her mother—but this story was by Dorothy Parker, whose career was entering its last-gasp phase. Wait, what? Really? Vulture explains how coincidence, indiscretion, and “an opportunity to sting the current […]

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