Posts Tagged: Wes Anderson

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #92: Bud Smith

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It’s hard to say when I first became aware of Bud Smith’s writing. I’m sure it was online; his work is fairly ubiquitous here—an essay here, a poem there, a short story someplace else. He’s got a few books under his belt to boot, the stellar F-250 and Calm Face, as well as the most recent, Dust Bunny City, for which his wife, Rae Buleri, did the brilliant illustrations.

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This Week in Short Fiction: Thus Were Their Faces by Silvina Ocampo

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Probably more than anything else, sheer curiosity propels readers through [Silvina Ocampo's] stories. ...more

Wes Anderson’s Train Love

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In Wes Anderson’s latest film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, train travel proves to be a difficult feat for the character Zero (Tony Revolori). Despite Zero’s train travel plight, Anderson himself enjoys a good train ride (the joy of such playing a prominent role in The Darjeeling Limited) and says of this form of travel, “It’s a calm, friendly, leisurely, and extremely protracted type of experience.” He is quoted on the Amtrak blog:

One thing you almost always get on a train is time to burn… But it’s especially nice to have that time while you are on the move.

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Notable New York, This Week 11/9 – 11/15

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This week in New York Ben Marcus and Rivka Galchen at Harper’s Magazine’s The Family Table, Wes Anderson and Noah Baumbach talk, Mary Gaitskill, John Turturro, and Eric Bogosian at PEN benefit, Frederick Wiseman’s documentary La Danse, Jeff Lewis and the Wowz!

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THE EYEBALL: Fake Out

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Rumpus blogger Rick Moody posted a comment to my recent post about Lord of the Rings asking whether the special effects of that film still held up. I got to thinking about why we accept some special effects as cool even when we can tell they’re fake while we turn up our noses at other special effects.

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Best Love Scene, Ever?

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So, like, what’s your favorite love scene from the movies? I would like to know yours. Mine is this motel seduction sequence from Bottle Rocket. I believe that part of its imperfect perfection lies in the choice of music, “Alone Again Or,” by Love, with its mariachi horns absurdly invoking the allure of Inez.

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