Posts Tagged: William Carlos Williams

The Last Book I Loved: Poeta en San Francisco by Barbara Jane Reyes

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Through incisive and uncompromising verse, Reyes unearths the hypocrisy at work in exalted American democracy... ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Erik Kennedy

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Poet Erik Kennedy discusses literary community and his formative years as a young writer in New Jersey, and shares two new prose poems. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Clarence Major

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Clarence Major discusses his new collection Chicago Heat and Other Stories, the artist's role in politics, Donald Trump and race relations, and Paris in the good old days. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #60: Leah Kaminsky

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Leah Kaminsky’s debut novel, The Waiting Room, depicts one fateful day in the life of an Australian doctor and mother, Dina, living in Haifa, Israel. Dina is trying to maintain normalcy as she goes about her work as a family doctor, cares for her son, and fights to preserve her faltering relationship with her husband, with whom she’s expecting a daughter.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 6): “To Elsie”

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Now the battle is joined. I will prosecute my part of it as a writer till the last dog dies... ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Connie Wanek

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Connie Wanek discusses her latest book, Rival Gardens: New and Selected Poems, the challenge of looking back at older poems, and what prioritizing writing looks like. ...more

Lucia Berlin Unplugged

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When there’s emotional truth, there follows a rhythm, and I think a beauty of image, because you’re seeing clearly.

In 1996 Lucia Berlin’s students Kellie Paluck and Adrian Zupp interviewed her for a class on poetics. Published now at Lit Hub, via Picador, Berlin talks about her influences, plain-style poets like William Carlos Williams, Robert Creeley, and Ed Dorn, and the chronic homesickness and loneliness that forged her instinctual mode of writing.

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The Rumpus Interview with Terese Svoboda

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Poet Terese Svoboda talks about her biography of the socialist-anarchist firebrand and modernist poet Lola Ridge, Anything That Burns You, and remembers a time when the political was printed in newspapers. ...more

R.I.P. #5: Fantastic Casket

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As far as the market right now, this is the moment to own it on caskets because we have the baby boomer generation coming up, and they’re doubling the number of deaths that are happening. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Campbell McGrath

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Campbell McGrath talks about his new collection, XX: Poems For The Twentieth Century, capitalism, history, and what it might mean to write a wordless poem. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: Not That Town

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Times like those lead you to believe that writing is, before it’s anything else, about simply getting it straight. ...more

Remarks On Walking Around in Boston

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As you walk, you become intensely aware in two directions. There is the outer world, and there is your head space. It is not necessary or possible really to keep strict focus on one or the other. They blend together. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Les Standiford

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Prolific writer and Director of the FIU Creative Writing Program Les Standiford takes a look back at his career in books, including Water to the Angels and Bringing Adam Home, and tells us what's next. ...more

Swinging Modern Sounds #59: Not a Folk Singer

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There is a lot to learn from Vashti Bunyan, therefore, about how to live a self-designed life, and how to be unapologetic and decisive about the habit of songwriting. ...more

Paterson’s Great Falls, inspiration for writers, named national park

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President Barack Obama signed legislation on Monday naming the Great Falls on the Passaic River in Paterson, N.J. a national historic park.

The 77-foot falls, site of early American industrial plants, has also inspired American writers. The great 20th century poets William Carlos Williams, whose epic work “Paterson” used the falls and the river as embodiments of American spirit, and Allen Ginsberg, who also commemorated the falls in his work, grew up nearby.

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