Posts Tagged: WWII

The Rumpus Interview with Lucy Jane Bledsoe

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Lucy Jane Bledsoe discusses her latest book, A Thin Bright Line, uncovering the remarkable story of her aunt, and illuminating history through the lens of imagination. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chris Santiago

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Chris Santigo on his new collection Tula, writing a multilingual text, and the connections between music and writing poetry. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Vanessa Hua

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Vanessa Hua discusses her debut collection, Deceit and Other Possibilities, writing fiction in order to understand life as an American-born child of immigrants, and the importance of literary community. ...more

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project #60: Leah Kaminsky

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Leah Kaminsky’s debut novel, The Waiting Room, depicts one fateful day in the life of an Australian doctor and mother, Dina, living in Haifa, Israel. Dina is trying to maintain normalcy as she goes about her work as a family doctor, cares for her son, and fights to preserve her faltering relationship with her husband, with whom she’s expecting a daughter.

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David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 4): “Roosters”

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the roosters brace their cruel feet and glare // with stupid eyes / while from their beaks there rise / the uncontrolled, traditional cries. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: 21 Poems That Shaped America (Pt. 2): “Ave Maria”

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Mothers of America / let your kids go to the movies! ...more

The Sunday Rumpus Interview: Anne Raeff

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Married authors Anne Raeff and Lori Ostlund, both winners of the Flannery O’Connor Award for Short Fiction, discuss their craft, their process, and the way they negotiate the give and take involved in sharing a vocation. ...more

David Biespiel’s Poetry Wire: The Suit

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It was as if he understood that the authentic must begin in the voice. And through the texture of the voice—its moral and psychological claims—sensory details emerge with absolute authority. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Used to Be Schwartz

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When I told my friend Aharon that my family name used to be Schwartz, he said, “Used to be Schwartz—sounds like a Borscht Belt act.” ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Kathleen Spivack

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Poet Kathleen Spivack discusses releasing her debut novel Unspeakable Things at age seventy-seven. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Bruce Bauman

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Bruce Bauman discusses his latest book, Broken Sleep, why rock isn’t dead (yet), how humor makes life bearable, and why we should reinstate the draft. ...more

Michel Tournier and the Novel of Ideas

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Do novels think? ...more

A Figurative Recovery from War

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In his review for Hyperallergic of a new MOMA exhibit, Thomas Micchelli writes about the work of artists during and immediately after their experiences in World War II. In the exhibit, Soldier, Spectre, Shaman: The Figure and the Second World War, Micchelli claims that the 20th century art historical record finally will be reconciled with the inclusion of figurative art from this period.

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The Saturday Rumpus Essay: Song in the Subjunctive

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Perhaps the city looked more poignantly lovely because I was conscious of its tragic history. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Jay Rubin

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Author and translator Jay Rubin talks about his new novel, The Sun Gods, translating Haruki Murakami into English, and the internment of Japanese citizens during World War II. ...more

Thebes

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The tragedy of a mentally ill mind or a richly realized fantasy is that its world exists only for its inventor. It is the loneliest party, the most isolating game. ...more

Charles Simic on Walt Whitman

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Poet Charles Simic may prefer the “pleasant aftertaste” of a literary amuse-bouche before bed, but when prompted about one of his favorite literary passages, he chose Walt Whitman’s “A Sight in Camp in the Daybreak Gray and Dim.” Over at the Atlantic, Simic explains why the poem moves him through the context of his experiences growing up in Belgrade during WWII:

I’m not a person who gets teary-eyed reading poetry—other people’s poetry, or my own.

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The New York Comics and Picture-Story Symposium: William H. Foster III on African Americans in Early American Comic Books, 1940-1950

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The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Tuesday nights 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City.

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Slow and Steady

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It took Gene Oishi 50 years to write his debut novel, a story about Japanese American identity and family during and after World War II. Over at The Nervous Breakdown, Oishi interviews himself about the process of writing Fox Drum Bebop:

I had a lot of excuses, but the reason I didn’t want to write about the war years was because I was unsure of who I was.

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Amis, Oates, and the Foul-Smelling Meadow

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Recent [WWII] novels by Susanna Moore and Ayelet Waldman achieve their emotional power by focussing upon characters peripheral to the terrible European history that has nonetheless altered their lives. The conflagration must be glimpsed indirectly, following Appelfeld’s admonition that “one does not look directly into the sun.”

Such circumspection has not been Martin Amis’s strategy in approaching the Holocaust.

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