Posts Tagged: zora neale hurston

What to Read When You’re Thinking about Florida

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In celebration of our Floridian friends and family, we've compiled a list of great books that take place in, engage with, or otherwise visit the "Sunshine state." ...more

Notable Portland: 5/11–5/17

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Thursday 5/11: The Writers in the Schools program at Grant High School hosts a student reading to share their semester of work. Broadway Books, 7 p.m., free.

Jeff VanderMeer, author of Southern Reach Trilogy, reads from his new book, Borne, a story about two humans and two creatures.

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VISIBLE: Women Writers of Color: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

The Saturday Rumpus Essay: No Wound

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Maybe I can touch it and show it to you. If I convince you, we can call it real. And then perhaps it will be. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Emily Raboteau

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Emily Raboteau discusses her essay, “Know Your Rights!” from the collection, The Fire This Time, what she loves about motherhood, and why it’s time for White America to get uncomfortable. ...more

The Conversation: Angel Nafis, Safia Elhillo, and Elizabeth Acevedo

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I don’t think it ever fully sunk in for me that I even live in America. ...more

Women Writers Lost and Found

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Henry James found in the stories of Constance Fenimore Woolson “a remarkable minuteness of observation and tenderness of feeling on the part of one who evidently did not glance and pass, but lingered and analyzed.”

There’s a roll call of rediscovered and canonical women writers at Salon

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Anna March’s Reading Mixtape #22: Classic Novels That Are a Joy to Read

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Sometimes we bypass the classic novels on the way to the rich offering of current literary fiction. Fair enough; there is so much to love in today’s fiction. But once in a while, dust off a classic gem and consider the language, the depth, the metaphorical heft these books carry—along with being engrossing, powerful reads.

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The Saturday Rumpus Interview: Josie Pickens

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Josie Pickens talks about building relationships through blogging, changing the narrative around black women in America, and eradicating silence through storytelling. ...more

The Rumpus Interview with Margo Jefferson

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Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson talks about her new memoir, Negroland, and about growing up in an elite black community in the segregated Chicago of the 1950s and 1960s. ...more

(Don’t) Stick To What You Know

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At the Atlantic, Angela Flournoy, author of The Turner House, discusses her struggle with writing about Detroit without having lived there, and how Zora Neale Hurston’s work helped her give herself permission to write outside her own experiences:

It’s not about having a background that lines up with the characters you’re writing about, I realized.

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Black and White Portraits from the Harlem Renaissance

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Van Vechten took to Zora Neale Hurston and especially to Langston Hughes. Biographies tell us that Hughes didn’t doubt Van Vechten’s sincerity, but he worried nevertheless how their connection would look in Harlem. Countee Cullen would eventually sit for Van Vechten, but in the 1920s, as a young black poet who believed he could write a lyric poetry that was color-blind, an escape from race, he kept his distance from the man who was already controversial as a white patron of black artists.

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