Posts Tagged: Ron Silliman

Notable Philadelphia: 4/11–4/17

By

Tuesday 4/11: Tamara J. Ralis reads from Dreamers of Earth and Aether. 7 p.m. at Wooden Shoe. SUNDRUNK reading series: Lost & Found. Featured poets: Brittanie Sterner, Kassidi Jones, and Patrick McNeil. 7 p.m. at Crime & Punishment Brewing. Ron Silliman and Michael Rothenburg read at 6:30 p.m. at Penn Book Center.

...more

Notable NYC: 1/24–1/30

By

Saturday 1/24: Barbara Elovic reads Other People’s Stories, poems. BookCourt, 7 p.m., free. Sophie Seita and Ron Silliman join the Segue Series. Zinc Bar, 4:30 p.m., $5. Maxwell Donnewald, Jacob Kaplan, Bill Kemmler, Sam Regal, and Stephen Lloyd launch Sporadicus. Mellow Pages, 7:30 p.m., free. Sunday 1/25: Shelly Oria and Lee Matthew Goldberg join the […]

...more

The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

By

Partially due to anti-porn Internet filters, the Canadian magazine The Beaver is changing its name. (via Silliman) The end was near, and now it is near, and damn it, why won’t it just get here already. The Guardian writes on the history of apocalypses. Loredo, Texas no longer has a bookstore. (via The Millions) “My work’s […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

It’s Saturday night and it’s poetry time. Who else is excited? I always figured the Irish got excited about poetry. Roddy Doyle says otherwise. I’m late to the game in discovering the Poetry Foundation’s podcasts, but I’m having some fun listening to them. I liked Ron Silliman’s discussion of writing a poem with an eraser, […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

Here’s some interesting reading from the world of poetry this week. Michael Schaub at HTMLGIANT picks up where the Poetry Foundation left off a little while ago about martinis and poets. You’ll like their entries. This is a little dated by internet standards, but it’s still worth looking at: Calvin Trillin versifies about the Roman […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

The Sycamore Review paid someone for a poem. It cost them a quarter and the poem was written on a bar napkin. Sounds like a worthwhile trade. Kent Johnson on The New British School Publishing an e-version of your book? Prepare to be boarded. I think this is a terrific way to get poetry out […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

Alison Flood, writing in The Guardian implores her fellow citizens to vote in the BBC’s poll for the nation’s favorite poet. She’s worried that there will be a rehash of 1995, when Britain chose Rudyard Kipling’s “If” as its favorite poem. Her personal choice of Gerard Manley Hopkins isn’t bad, in my opinion. I feel […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

MIke Chasar delves into a different side of pin-up poetry. Ron Silliman on the passing of David Bromige. Dale Smith has a few words to say on the latest salvo from Flarf and Conceptual Poetry practitioners. Harry Potter writes poetry. Okay, Dan Radcliffe writes it, and publishes it under a pseudonym. Of course he does–he’s […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

The poet Deborah Digges died April 10, and there’s been a number of remembrances posted online, along with stories and selections from from her work. Ron Silliman notes the passing of Franklin Rosemont, Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick, and Henri Meschonnic. Travis Nichols has more on Deborah Digges and Franklin Rosemont. Congratulations to Fanny Howe and Ange […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

Congratulations to Juan Felipe Herrera and August Kleinzahler on their shared National Book Critics Circle Award in Poetry for 2008. Barbara Jane Reyes has more on Herrera. Ron Silliman on on anthologies: “It is all but impossible to even characterize the map of poetry today. If this were the 1950s, a quarter of America’s poets […]

...more

Poetic Lives Online: Links by Brian Spears

By

Interesting conversation going on about a piece in the latest Poetry. Start here at Samizdat, then find further discussion at A Compulsive Reader, Exoskeleton (multiple posts–click around), and back to Samizdat. And since it started over an article written by Jason Guriel, I’ll link him too— only for something different— the curse of the duty-write. […]

...more