Posts by: Adam Keller

Office Space, the Final Frontier

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In A.O. Scott’s eyes, summer blockbusters and workplace sitcoms aren’t that different these days: Part of what makes work tolerable is the idea that it is heroic, the fantasy that repetitive and meaningless tasks are charged with risk and significance. Pecking away at our keyboards, we’re cowboys, warriors, superheroes. But meanwhile, superheroics look like every […]

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Ghost in the Machine

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At the Los Angeles Review of Books, Professor Ted Underwood talks about why Digital Humanities, the new discipline he’s often associated with, doesn’t exist: It’s true that [Digital Humanities] can be aligned with managerial thinking—administrators like it. It can also be hypnotized by shiny pictures and prone to moralistic groupthink on social media. Everything that […]

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The Things Abandoned by Hollywood

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Thinking about his films while watching an American film leads to a sobering realization: all the things that Kiarostami could not show in his films became the only things Hollywood filmmakers chose to show in theirs. What he showed in his films were the things abandoned by Hollywood: conversation, friendship, understanding, compassion, and empathy. There’s […]

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Empire State of Memoir

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For Lit Hub, Edward White writes about Jay Z and Morrissey’s experimental memoirs, investigating how both artists indulge and subvert what readers want from a musician’s autobiography: Where Morrissey gives us a conventional autobiography in an unconventional way—no chapters, paragraphs that run for half-a-dozen pages, and seemingly no contribution from an editor—Jay-Z is more formally experimental, […]

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At Heaven’s Gates

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At the New Yorker, Richard Brody shares a eulogy for director Michael Cimino: Cimino’s life work is a cinema of mourning, an art of grief, a nightmare of memory that finds its sole redemption in ecstasy—the heightened perception that transforms experience into a grand internal spectacle, which finds its own embodiment in Cimino’s own profound visual imagination.

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Wild Water Kingdom

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If anything, the private spaces of the Monterey Bay Aquarium are even more magical that the public ones. The exact same aesthetic sensibility that pervades the viewing galleries—clean, calm, scientifically sound, technologically advanced—also characterizes the service corridors, which is nice because it appeals to my sense of symmetry. But does it actually matter? Does it […]

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On Keeping a Bullet Journal

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Several bullet journal gurus in that community have built significant online followings by posting photos of their hypnotically beautiful notebook spreads. “It’s pretty insane, I initially started posting photos of my journal on Instagram just to archive my process, and then I started racking up followers,” said graphic designer Ursula Hudson, who has been keeping […]

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The Detainees’ Tales

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A group of authors in Britain is using the format of Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales to raise awareness of the plight of modern-day refugees: They don’t feel safe enough to share their stories themselves … but they have a tremendous frustration at being voiceless. So we came up with the idea of using The Canterbury Tales as a model of journeying and […]

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No Dancing, Please

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FACT‘s profile of rising electronic musician Seiho Hayakawa serves as an introduction to the unique challenges the underground music scene in Japan has had to contend with over the years: While the internet and cheaper travel have helped break down many of the physical barriers that once isolated Japan, the way the music industry operates remains difficult to […]

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The Real Thing

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James Patterson has announced a new imprint of $5 books designed to hook readers who can’t afford more expensive titles. He’s already written personally written twenty titles for the project: Asked if he hoped this was going to be the gateway to people reading deeper, longer books down the road, he said, “No. This is […]

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Harlem Is Nowhere

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A new exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago takes visitors through the collaborative efforts of writer Ralph Ellison and photographer Gordon Parks: In some ways, their collaboration is akin to a great songwriting duo… One handles the music, the other lyrics, and there’s never something that comes completely first. They understood that the sum […]

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In Search of Haven

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Reporter Wolfgang Bauer and photographer Stanislav Krupar went undercover in 2014 to document the Syrian refugee crisis, eventually violating the law in their transport of migrants. Their book Crossing the Sea documents the crisis and humanizes the refugees in a time when the news media often turns a blind eye: What Crossing the Sea does […]

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Rabid Puppies Butt Invasion

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The Rabid Puppies, an MRA group trying to overthrow the “progressive conspiracy” poisoning the Hugo Awards for the second year in a row, have continued their fearless activism by nominating Chuck Tingle’s Space Raptor Butt Invasion for Best Novelette. Tingle, author of erotic novelettes such as Unicorn Butt Cops: Beach Patrol and Glazed By The […]

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Waiting for Wallace

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Despite its “near-canonical” status in America, David Foster Wallace’s Infinite Jest is taking its sweet time in the translation process. So far, it has only been translated into five other languages. At Lit Hub, Scott Esposito spoke to writers and translators to get a feel for how non-English-speaking readers have received Wallace’s opus.

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