Poetry

Visible: Women Writers of Color #5: Tara Betts

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Tara Betts discusses her newest collection, Break the Habit, the burden placed on black women artists to be both artist and activist, and why writing is rooted in identity. ...more

Poem of the Day: “Sound & Fury” by Claudia Rankine

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Claudia Rankine is an oracle. Her poetry is beautiful, interrogative, and inventive, as seen in Don’t Let Me Be Lonely and Citizen (the American lyric we need for a path forward). Her consideration and public consciousness is nothing less than illuminating, and necessary in these dire times mercilessly lacking in empathy.

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The Rumpus Interview with Dawn Lundy Martin

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Dawn Lundy Martin discusses her most recent collection, Life in a Box is a Pretty Life, the intersections between poetry and social justice, her wide variety of inspirations, and bathroom gender binaries. ...more

The Rumpus Poetry Book Club Chat with Chris Santiago

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Chris Santigo on his new collection Tula, writing a multilingual text, and the connections between music and writing poetry. ...more

This Week in Books: The Light on the Wall

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Welcome to This Week in Books, where we highlight books just released by small and independent presses. Books have always been a symbol for and means of spreading knowledge and wisdom, and they are an important part of our toolkit in fighting for social justice.

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The Rumpus Inaugural Poems

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Official inaugural poems are a strange beast. There have only been five of them and the one we recognize as the first, Robert Frost’s “The Gift Outright,” wasn’t composed for President Kennedy’s inauguration. Frost recited it when the sun’s glare off the snow made the poem he’d written, “Dedication,” impossible to read.

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Poem of the Day: “Burial Practice” by Srikanth Reddy

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Srikanth Reddy’s Facts for Visitors, from which this poem is from, came out in 2004; it has beautiful and inventive poems which Reddy has continued to produce since then in books like Voyager (which is a book of erasure made from Kurt Waldheim’s memoir, In the Eye of the Storm).

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14 Possibilities of Native Poetry

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Natalie Diaz, Featured Guest Editor for the January edition of Connotation Press, has curated a portfolio titled “14 Possibilities of Native Poetry.” In her introduction she poses the question, What is Native poetry?, and then responds:

What is Native poetry means there can be infinite possibilities, infinite poets and their infinite poems who might be an answer.

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Letter to Jim

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Many days I couldn’t see the way forward, but I kept going, the way you had. It was you, after all, who taught me how to stay. ...more

Poem of the Day: “An American Poem” by Eileen Myles

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Eileen Myles has been a badass writer for a while now; she tears down what needs be torn down, unapologetically, and fosters a communal feeling, inspiring others to do the same. During the time this poem was published in Not Me, Myles famously ran for president in a write-in campaign—and for many, Maggie Nelson among them, Myles is absolutely our president.

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The Rumpus Interview with Stacy Szymaszek

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Poet Stacy Szymaszek discusses her most recent collection, Journal of Ugly Sites & Other Journals, the "notebook genre," and claiming a city—ugly sites and all. ...more

Poem of the Day: “At Night the States” by Alice Notley

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“At Night the States” is a famous poem that, whether you have or haven’t heard it before, strikes you over the head repeatedly. Formally inventive without any loss in the depth of its feeling, Notley transcends the genre of elegy to an expression of grief that might register unmediated: it is a present poem, an immediate poem, an inconsolable poem.

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Of Poetry and Protest and Monticello In Mind

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Barbara Berman reviews Of Poetry and Protest: From Emmitt Till to Trayvon Martin and Monticello In Mind: Fifty Contemporary Poems on Jefferson today in Rumpus Poetry. ...more