Quantcast

Reviews

Diversifying the YA Hero: Ed Lin’s David Tung Can’t Have a Girlfriend Until He Gets into an Ivy League College

Reviewed By

In Ed Lin’s young adult novel, David Tung Can’t Have a Girlfriend Until He Gets into an Ivy League College, a high schooler named David dreams of getting into an Ivy League school and becoming a doctor. But his parents have enforced a strict rule: “I’d been told in no uncertain terms by my mother […]

...more

The Light Endures: 13th Balloon by Mark Bibbins

Reviewed By

Grief begs to be analogized, not to be tamed exactly, but somehow made approachable.

...more

A Myriad Reckoning: Seismic: Seattle, City of Literature

Reviewed By

The collective reimagining in Seismic calls for literary revolution.

...more

A Literary Tasting Menu: My Year Abroad by Chang-rae Lee

Reviewed By

Simply put, the novel’s heart is not political but sensual.

...more

A Poetics of Questions: The Bower by Connie Voisine

Reviewed By

To learn is perhaps Voisine’s primary goal in writing the poems in The Bower.

...more

Asking the Right Questions: Yaa Gyasi’s Transcendent Kingdom

Reviewed By

Transcendent Kingdom becomes an experiment in itself.

...more

Not Looking Away: The State She’s In by Lesley Wheeler

Reviewed By

But look at this poet-speaker speaking the unspeakable!

...more

When Ideals Meet Reality: The Contradictions by Sophie Yanow

Reviewed By

You want to live by your ideals, but it’s hard to make them align with reality.

...more

A Language for Extinction: Zaina Alsous’s A Theory of Birds

Reviewed By

And if you ask of her to come to you, her answer is refusal.

...more

Haunted by Hoax: Paul Griner’s The Book of Otto and Liam

Reviewed By

But Griner is too skilled a realist to allow The Book of Otto and Liam to become a simple revenge story.

...more

The Violent and the Sensual: original kink by Jubi Arriola-Headley

Reviewed By

Violence can be turned around, turned into pleasure, or an act of freedom, or an act of defiance.

...more

In and of the Wreck: Together in a Sudden Strangeness

Reviewed By

In its imagery and mood, the collection feels distinctly April.

...more

Possibility Is Spellbinding: The Lightness by Emily Temple

Reviewed By

In short, lightness is the capacity to leave without regret.

...more

Reading the Landscape of the Past: Jessica J. Lee’s Two Trees Make a Forest

Reviewed By

Learning to read a landscape can reveal a deep history.

...more

The Worlds We Inhabit: Home: New Arabic Poems

Reviewed By

These writers expand the meaning of the word home by virtue of their lives and their writing.

...more

A Different Kind of Butterfly Effect: Frances Cha’s If I Had Your Face

Reviewed By

[Y]ou can’t grow up in a cultural milieu and be immune to what it loves.

...more

The Complex Disability Representation We Need: Rebekah Taussig’s Sitting Pretty

Reviewed By

What Taussig does, then, is ground these ideas in reality through her own lived experiences.

...more

Desire Makes Storytellers of Us All: Anthropica by David Hollander

Reviewed By

What a fitting end to the postmodern literary experiment. Or are we just getting warmed up?

...more

Documenting Existence: Deed by Justin Wymer

Reviewed By

Wymer is grappling with survival, with the cost of the duplicity of identity.

...more

Still Wouldst Thou Sing: Nightingale by Paisley Rekdal

Reviewed By

Figures from antiquity—those masks of learned, privileged poets—are rendered utterly contemporary, down to earth.

...more

Identity Politics and the English Language: Naoise Dolan’s Exciting Times

Reviewed By

Who “owns” the English language?

...more