Posts Tagged: galleycat

Books and Kickstarter

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Thinking about launching your book on Kickstarter?

Writer Seth Godin has chronicled his experience with his own book project on Kickstarter and calls it an “experiment in publishing.” Godin says:

Kickstarter seems custom made to solve the 10,000 copy problem. The author with a tribe can reach out to her readers, activate them and make an offer: if enough of you agree to buy this book today, I’ll write it and send it to you just before a publisher puts it on sale…

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Tweets: The New Money

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“Pay with a Tweet allows writers, publishers, musicians, artists and companies to set up social network exchanges. Readers simply click on the “Pay with a Tweet” button on the website, downloading book excerpts, eBooks, music and other goods in exchange for a promotional tweet in exchange for a “promotional tweet.”

Apparently, thousands of people already realized the currency change and have been buying and selling their books and beer with tweets.

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Touré Interview

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“Post-racial suggests a world where race does not exist and racism does not exist, and it’s a completely ridiculous term…With post-Blackness, what I’m talking about is a conception of Blackness where the identity options are infinite. So, we’re not saying THIS is what it is to be Black.”

That is Touré conversing with Galleycat about his new book Who’s Afraid of Post-Blackness?

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From NaNoWriMo To 6-Figure Advance

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Erin Morgenstern’s novel, The Night Circus, will debut in September. Beginning as manuscript for National Novel Writing Month in 2005, and subsequently rejected by 30 agents, the novel has won a six-figure deal. The Wall Street Journal examines Morgenstern’s role in the “race to discover the next Harry Potter.” And Galleycat reflects on the lessons for writers in her story:

“Your National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) manuscript is only a first draft and needs months or years of editing before publication.

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Ceasefire Liberia And The Promise of the Internet

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Going through the book blogs every week, I read a lot  about how the Internet is ruining everything — from publishing to our attention spans to investigative journalism to our social lives. But every once in a while, I hear about an online project that’s so necessary and does so much good that I flash back to what it was like when all this technology was brand new and we thought it would turn the world into some sort of tech-happy utopia.

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