Posts Tagged: Last Book I Loved

The Last Book I Loved: So Long, See You Tomorrow

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By drawing us into his childhood, Maxwell shows us how to revisit our own. We become the storytellers of our own lives. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: Abbott Awaits

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Summer works like this. Every day small moments cycle like waves within tides, eroding our opportunities on a geological scale invisible from our point of immersion. ...more

The Last Book I Loved: Sheila Levine Is Dead and Living In New York

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But when my loneliness feels as vast—and capable of drowning me—as the sea, this book about self-destruction comforts me more than any self-help. ...more

The Last Book of Poems I Loved: Memory by Laura Jensen

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Laura Jensen’s Memory begins with the eponymous poem about a falconer, whose falcon flies after its prey and doesn’t return until evening, surprising its master when it lands in the window clutching its prize. The poem ends with a lovely figure that I extend to her poetry’s effect on me:

Like memory, it
returned when it was unexpected.

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The Last Book of Poems I Loved: Blood Sugar by Nicole Blackman

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It’s fitting that Nicole Blackman leads into the poems of Blood Sugar with a quote from the confessional poet W.D. Snodgrass: “I am going to show you something very ugly. One day it may save your life.” The chief construct of confessional poetry is the brutally honest autobiography of the poet and the act of writing bravely, honestly and transgressively.

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Letter to An Imaginary Friend: Super-Sized Rockin’ Poetry

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If Thomas McGrath were a painter, he would apply fat brushes to giant canvasses in complex color and texture. Gershwin’s gloss and the landscape of Copland are tame music compared to his. McGrath writes in the dissonance of Ives – American cacophony in contrasting threads of autobiography and cause, the red-white-and-blue Midwest against a vein of committed activism.

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The Last Book I Loved: “Please” by Jericho Brown

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Jericho Brown’s Please explores the way love and violence coexist with each other and how the two sometimes intertwine. The collection of poems is categorized by four sections: “Repeat,” “Pause,” “Power,” and finally, “Stop”; the first three sections address self-identification both psychologically and sexually, his relationships with his father, mother, and lovers, and what it is like to tame terrorized beauty.

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