Posts Tagged: literature

Trigger Warning Literature

By

Requests by students at University of California Santa Barbara, Oberlin College, Rutgers University, University of Michigan, George Washington University, and other institutions for ““trigger warnings” on classroom literature has sparked an interesting debate.

The New York Times has the full story.

...more

Letterpress and Pictures, Literature and Art

By

Should art and literature be treated independently? The Paris Review Daily reports that the British Library has recently released an online collection of 1,200 Romantic and Victorian texts in the first phase of a plan to digitize various literary periods. Notably included is The Yellow Book, a literary quarterly that strictly distinguished between the two mediums.

...more

The Literary Novel is Dead! Long Live the Literary Novel!

By

It happens every now and then that we find someone toasting (or mourning) the death of the novel—this time, it’s Will Self’s turn.

“How do you think it feels to have dedicated your entire adult life to an art form only to see the bloody thing dying before your eyes?” At the Guardian, the British writer answers his own question with the transcript of his Richard Hillary Memorial Lecture.

...more

A Parenthetical Suffering

By

According to Christopher Benfey, literature has a long history of writers including characters’ personal struggles in parentheses within the text. To learn how that worked in Nabokov’s “Lolita” or Virginia Woolf’s “To The Lighthouse” (and to discover that there’s an entire study on the subject), check out Benfey’s essay on the New York Review of Books‘s blog.

...more

5. Mad Julius Caesar

The New York Comic & Picture-Story Symposium: R. Sikoryak

By

The New York Comics & Picture-Story Symposium is a weekly forum for discussing the tradition and future of text/image work. Open to the public, it meets Monday nights at 7-9 p.m. EST in New York City. Presentations vary weekly and include everything from historical topics and technical demonstrations to creators presenting their work.

...more

1

The Rumpus At SF Lit Crawl!

By

Tomorrow Night!

The Rumpus proudly presents: For We Have Fallen to Our Knees!

The Rumpus is excited to participate in the San Francisco Lit Crawl! Come see readings by: Lucy Corin, Saeed JonesMac McClelland, and Brian McMullen!

...more

Better Books, Better Brains

By

If you’ve ever felt like reading good literature gives you more comfort and insight than any self-help book ever could, you’re probably onto something.

Scientists at the University of Liverpool recently conducted a study indicating that the brain “lights up” bigger and brighter when grappling with Shakespeare and Wordsworth than when taking in ordinary prose.

...more

A Place for Literary Videos

By

In response to YouTube’s lack of a literature category, Reddit has created its own “underground” site for literary videos.

“Poetry videos, short story videos, live readings, spoken work performance, audiobook links, animated storytelling videos, documentaries about writers, book trailers, author interviews, and anything else you can think up that combines literature and other media.”

(Via GalleyCat)

...more

One More Thing That Literature Is Good For

By

A few weeks ago, I went to a dermatologist to have something on my nose removed. He said less than two sentences to me, asked me one question he didn’t listen to the answer to, ignored my protests, had a nurse hold me down, stuck a large needle in my nose with no warning, and then dug the thing out with a scalpel even though the anesthesia was barely working.

...more

Using Genre As A Tool

By

“But the idea that genre is a tool, not a prophecy goes beyond combating genre snobbery, I think — it’s actually helpful for writers to think about when crafting their next novel.

Just because there’s this marvelous tool for helping readers to understand your story, doesn’t mean your story has to be crafted around the tool.”

At io9, they’re talking about the advantages of using genre as a tool, especially in regards to sci-fi.

...more