Posts Tagged: NASA

The American Woman

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[A]s the world found out on January 28, 1986, an extraordinary circumstance can also be an unimaginable tragedy.

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The Rumpus Interview with Patrick Ryan

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Patrick Ryan discusses his new collection The Dream Life of Astronauts, the “bad old days,” and the human need to believe that everything will turn out okay in the end (even when we know it won’t).

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Weekly Geekery

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Why Finnish women matter to the history of science fiction. Holiday science books: let visions of squid and sarcophagi dance in their heads. Astronauts survive thanks to a black female mathematician. This robot could make your toddler Mark Zuckerberg. (Minus the billions.)

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The Sunday Rumpus Essay: Tinfoil Astronaut

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Every time I leap there is a chance I will fall, and every time I fall there is a chance I will finally crack my head open like a Faberge egg and luminous black spiders will crawl out to mark the outline of my body with blinking stars and black thread.

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Bodies in Space: Teaching after Trauma

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Turning onto my street and looking south I feel the ground drop beneath me every time—I turn the corner and the sidewalk falls. I feel invisible then, as if I’ve vaporized.

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The Saturday Rumpus Review of The Martian

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It is the story of an astronaut stranded on Mars for about a year, all by himself.

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The Rumpus Interview with Sean Wilsey

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Sean Wilsey discusses his latest book of essays, More Curious, being David Foster Wallace’s neighbor, the healing power of the American road trip, and the difference between writing fiction and memoir.

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Reminder of the Importance of NASA

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Glasses, extra light wheelchairs, satellite technology, and even moon boot technology in KangaROOs. But even more impressive is NASA’s ability to get Gloria Steinem and Charlton Heston in the same room. Just a few days after many were disappointed by the update from the Curiosity, Wired shares vintage PSAs that are endearingly genuine reminders of all […]

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Inner Space

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In his children’s book This is Cape Canaveral (1963), Miroslav Sasek wrote, “On the east coast of Florida, 190 miles north of Miami, you enter a land of giants, of science-fiction-turned-fact, among whose denizens are the Atlas, the Thor, the Saturn, the Polaris, the Redstone, the Titan, the Jupiter. Their language includes mystic incantations such […]

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A History of Mars Exploration

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Last night, NASA’s Curiosity rover landed on the surface of Mars, beginning its year long exploration of the planet. The Guardian has compiled a short history of Mars musing, which highlights scientists’ fascination with the planet. Since their first sightings in the 17th century, scientists argued about the planet’s capability for sustaining life: “Lowell eventually ‘saw’ […]

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Look Closer

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Yesterday marked the fortieth anniversary of the launch of Landsat, America’s longest running Earth-imaging satellite program. Since the NASA-run program began in 1972, Landsat has captured more than three million images of our planet. To look at some particularly stunning photographs taken by the satellite (pictures chosen through Nasa’s ‘Earth as Art’ contest), click here. […]

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Novelists and NASA

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The publisher Tor/Forge and NASA will collaborate on the creation of “science-based science fiction.” The budding relationship will allow writers to consult scientists about the facts behind their stories. “GSFC’s Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office will host a select group of Tor/Forge authors — some of whom already write science based fiction — to learn […]

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Independent Astronauts

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Atlantis just returned from its last mission and here we are with our feet firmly on the ground. But surely there is an alternative to NASA. For inspiration into space travel here on earth experience the short film Life as An Independent Astronaut and an interview with the documentary’s star and director David Wilson. “The […]

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Albums of Our Lives: Sound of Genesis’ Journey to the Moon

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The Space Age drifted all around me: Major Matt Mason toys in various heroic poses on the basement floor, plastic red-and-blue rockets ascending and landing, the interstellar playing out under the pool table as astral 45s by Eumir Deodato (“Also Spake Zarathustra 2001”) and Vik Venus (“Moonflight”) revolve on the Bonomo family stereo. The latter […]

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Notes on E-books and Readers

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The big news this week was the iPad announcement, including the tech-world’s dismissal of it. (Fraser Speirs addresses that nicely.) But there’s a lot more happening in the world of e-books. For example, NASA just opened an e-book section and its first offering is a history of the X-15 hypersonic test aircraft. And the Library […]

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Science Saturday

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In yet another example of how the real world is far weirder than most peoples’ imaginations, I give you brain-shrinking algae. NASA has an iPhone app. There are scientific questions with surprising answers, and then there’s this one. MSNBC has a terrific collection of insect photos. Really beautiful closeups. The Walt Disney company is offering […]

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The Rumpus Sunday Book Blog Roundup

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Good morning, world. This week, the blogs are full of fun. Many of them had wondrous posts having to do with lovable, humorous, classic sci-fi authors like Vonnegut and Bradbury and Adams. It was a week made for me. Also, apologies in advance for the sparse posts today. School calls. The LA Times reconsiders Vonnegut, […]

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