Posts Tagged: newspapers

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The Rumpus Interview with Terese Svoboda

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Poet Terese Svoboda talks about her biography of the socialist-anarchist firebrand and modernist poet Lola Ridge, Anything That Burns You, and remembers a time when the political was printed in newspapers. ...more

Spelling Reformed

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At The Awl, Annie Abrams gives the history of a 19th-century newspaper, Di Anglo-Sacsun, and its editors’ attempts to make literacy more available to the public, by developing their own phonetic alphabet that the newspaper was written in. Abrams also dives into the controversy surrounding the name of the paper:

Andrews and Boyle pointedly explained that they did not choose the title “in a partisan or national spirit, or with a view to render prominent the dysfunction between the different branches of the human brotherhood,” but instead “because it seems to us to contain a proper allusion to the language which it is our primary object to reform.”

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Censorship in College Newspapers

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At the Atlantic, David R. Wheeler examines recent attempts to limit freedom of the press on college campuses, tracking conflicts between university officials and college newspapers and court cases:

In 2005, students at Governors State University in Illinois lost a lawsuit claiming that their First Amendment rights had been violated over the censorship of the school newspaper, The Innovator.

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Now, Writing is for Extroverts Too

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When my wife proposed writing a novel together last year, I was initially resistant but not for the most obvious reasons. I wasn’t worried about our ability to work together. I wasn’t even worried about whether we could actually produce a good novel.

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LaShonda Katrice Barnett by ellen foto in COLOR

The Rumpus Interview with LaShonda Katrice Barnett

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Novelist LaShonda Katrice Barnett discusses her debut novel, Jam on the Vine, how becoming a historian taught her about plot, Muslims living in Texas in the 19th century, and the Missouri State Penitentiary, also known as “the bloodiest 47 acres in America.” ...more

Delivery

Stakeout

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The villain struck early, usually just before dawn while the streets of Chicago were quiet, when most of its residents were still asleep, when it was unlikely there would be witnesses. He was stealthy and efficient, and his victims never realized what hit them until it was too late.

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What Happens When Literary Journals Report The News?

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With newspapers folding and cutting corners all around the country, it’s easy to give up entirely on the fourth estate. But now look who’s riding in on their white horse: those writers you newspaper types wouldn’t give jobs to before because they tried to make their articles all “literary.” Take that, 5 W’s.

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Newspapers dying? Maybe it’s just the cities they mythologized

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An interview on New American Media with writer Richard Rodriguez has a fascinating take on what’s happening to American newspapers. Using the famously provincial San Francisco Chronicle as an example, Rodriguez says,  “I don’t think the Chronicle is dying so much as I think that San Francisco is dying.”

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