Posts Tagged: Oxford American

This Week in Short Fiction

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This week, Oxford American has a stand-alone excerpt from Jesmyn Ward’s Sing, Unburied, Sing, her first novel since 2011’s National Book Award-winning Salvage the Bones. The excerpt, titled “Flayed,” follows a boy named Jojo in the rural Mississippi Gulf Coast as he helps his grandfather kill and butcher a goat on his thirteenth birthday.

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Making the Fantasy a Reality

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It’s particularly pleasurable to read interview between writers who know each other well. Over at Oxford American, long-time friends Ada Limón and Manuel Gonzales discuss Gonzales’s new novel, The Regional Office Is Under Attack, and what it means to write with an ear to the fantastical:

When I first started writing, though, I was deep into my college career as an English major and when I went to graduate school I aped mid-century realism—Carver, Yates, O’Connor, the like—trying to write austere, terse stories of disillusionment and vague regret, but these bored me.

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Ponce de León, You Are Not the Forefather

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Aside from a few shared scribbles of genetic code, it is difficult to say exactly what keeps us tethered to our distant ancestors. Over at Oxford American, Alex Mar thinks through the implications of incorporating these stories into our personal narratives as she confronts the terrible deeds of her oft-claimed ancestor—the conquistador, Ponce de León.

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The Rumpus Interview with Skip Horack

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Skip Horack talks about his new novel, The Other Joseph, blending research with fiction, and living with the “curse of the fiction writer.” ...more

Ultrarunning, Ultrawriting

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The relationship between writing and running has a long history, so perhaps it’s not surprising to see a cluster of longreads having to do with ultrarunning.

One is this New York Times Magazine profile of Kilian Jornet Burgada, “the most dominating endurance athlete of his generation,” who, judging by the article, seems to be some sort of mythical demigod.

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PANEL BUSTING: The Census

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At Oxford American, Rumpus columnist Nick Rombes breaks into the official US census for 1860, chronicling his reaction to the text and the traces left behind by past readers.

“Curled delicately, its oil having spread out in a bloom across the pages, the hair is part of a human body in a book about numbered bodies, enslaved and free, the insane, the married and unmarried, the ones with terrible secrets, the somnambulists, the literate and the ones for whom printed words exist only as abstractions…”

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